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The social norm of unemployment in relation to mental health and medical care use : the role of regional unemployment level and of displaced workers

Veerle Buffel (UGent) , Sarah Missinne (UGent) and Piet Bracke (UGent)
(2017) WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 31(3). p.501-521
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Abstract
The relationships between unemployment, mental health (care), and medication use among 50–65 year old men (N=11,789) and women (N=15,118) are studied in Europe. Inspired by the social norm theory of unemployment, the relevance of regional unemployment levels and workplace closure are explored, using multilevel analyses of data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement. In line with the social norm theory, the results show that–only for men–displaced workers are less depressed and use less medication than the non-displaced unemployed. However, they report more depressive symptoms than the employed, which supports the causal effect of unemployment on mental health. Non-displaced unemployed men are also more likely to consume medication than the displaced unemployed. In addition, using regional unemployment as a proxy for the social norm of unemployment can be questioned when studying mental health effects, as it seems to be a stronger measurement of labour market conditions than of the social norm of unemployment, especially during a recession.
Keywords
multilevel analysis, regional unemployment rates, mental health care and medication use, mental health, Displaced workers, Europe, Social norm of unemployment

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Buffel, Veerle, Sarah Missinne, and Piet Bracke. “The Social Norm of Unemployment in Relation to Mental Health and Medical Care Use : the Role of Regional Unemployment Level and of Displaced Workers.” WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY 31.3 (2017): 501–521. Print.
APA
Buffel, V., Missinne, S., & Bracke, P. (2017). The social norm of unemployment in relation to mental health and medical care use : the role of regional unemployment level and of displaced workers. WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY, 31(3), 501–521.
Chicago author-date
Buffel, Veerle, Sarah Missinne, and Piet Bracke. 2017. “The Social Norm of Unemployment in Relation to Mental Health and Medical Care Use : the Role of Regional Unemployment Level and of Displaced Workers.” Work Employment and Society 31 (3): 501–521.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Buffel, Veerle, Sarah Missinne, and Piet Bracke. 2017. “The Social Norm of Unemployment in Relation to Mental Health and Medical Care Use : the Role of Regional Unemployment Level and of Displaced Workers.” Work Employment and Society 31 (3): 501–521.
Vancouver
1.
Buffel V, Missinne S, Bracke P. The social norm of unemployment in relation to mental health and medical care use : the role of regional unemployment level and of displaced workers. WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 2017;31(3):501–21.
IEEE
[1]
V. Buffel, S. Missinne, and P. Bracke, “The social norm of unemployment in relation to mental health and medical care use : the role of regional unemployment level and of displaced workers,” WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 501–521, 2017.
@article{7048592,
  abstract     = {The relationships between unemployment, mental health (care), and medication use among 50–65 year old men (N=11,789) and women (N=15,118) are studied in Europe. Inspired by the social norm theory of unemployment, the relevance of regional unemployment levels and workplace closure are explored, using multilevel analyses of data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement. In line with the social norm theory, the results show that–only for men–displaced workers are less depressed and use less medication than the non-displaced unemployed. However, they report more depressive symptoms than the employed, which supports the causal effect of unemployment on mental health. Non-displaced unemployed men are also more likely to consume medication than the displaced unemployed. In addition, using regional unemployment as a proxy for the social norm of unemployment can be questioned when studying mental health effects, as it seems to be a stronger measurement of labour market conditions than of the social norm of unemployment, especially during a recession.},
  author       = {Buffel, Veerle and Missinne, Sarah and Bracke, Piet},
  issn         = {0950-0170},
  journal      = {WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY},
  keywords     = {multilevel analysis,regional unemployment rates,mental health care and medication use,mental health,Displaced workers,Europe,Social norm of unemployment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {501--521},
  title        = {The social norm of unemployment in relation to mental health and medical care use : the role of regional unemployment level and of displaced workers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0950017016631442},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2017},
}

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