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Reduplication with fixed segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a contact-induced phenomenon

Metin Bagriacik (UGent) and Mark Janse (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Partial reduplication with quasi-fixed segmentism in Cappadocian Greek and Armenian is discussed as a morphological phenomenon induced by contact with Turkish. It is argued that the reduplicant in all three languages is a tiered affix whose phonemic melody is not determined and hence is defined by that of the base. This reveals an asymmetry between the source and the recipient languages in employing reduplication and in the nature of the reduplicant affix, which should be accounted for language specifically. The discussion also provides evidence for selective copying of morphological items.
Keywords
Language Contact, Language Change, Adjective, Reduplication, Modern Greek, Asia Minor Greek, Armenian, Cappadocian, Turkish

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Citation

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MLA
Bagriacik, Metin, and Mark Janse. “Reduplication with Fixed Segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a Contact-induced Phenomenon.” Contact Morphology in Modern Greek Dialects. Ed. Angela Ralli. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2016. 179–209. Print.
APA
Bagriacik, M., & Janse, M. (2016). Reduplication with fixed segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a contact-induced phenomenon. In A. Ralli (Ed.), Contact morphology in modern Greek dialects (pp. 179–209). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Chicago author-date
Bagriacik, Metin, and Mark Janse. 2016. “Reduplication with Fixed Segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a Contact-induced Phenomenon.” In Contact Morphology in Modern Greek Dialects, ed. Angela Ralli, 179–209. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Bagriacik, Metin, and Mark Janse. 2016. “Reduplication with Fixed Segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a Contact-induced Phenomenon.” In Contact Morphology in Modern Greek Dialects, ed. Angela Ralli, 179–209. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Vancouver
1.
Bagriacik M, Janse M. Reduplication with fixed segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a contact-induced phenomenon. In: Ralli A, editor. Contact morphology in modern Greek dialects. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing; 2016. p. 179–209.
IEEE
[1]
M. Bagriacik and M. Janse, “Reduplication with fixed segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a contact-induced phenomenon,” in Contact morphology in modern Greek dialects, A. Ralli, Ed. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2016, pp. 179–209.
@incollection{7044458,
  abstract     = {Partial reduplication with quasi-fixed segmentism in Cappadocian Greek and Armenian is discussed as a morphological phenomenon induced by contact with Turkish. It is argued that the reduplicant in all three languages is a tiered affix whose phonemic melody is not determined and hence is defined by that of the base. This reveals an asymmetry between the source and the recipient languages in employing reduplication and in the nature of the reduplicant affix, which should be accounted for language specifically. The discussion also provides evidence for selective copying of morphological items.},
  author       = {Bagriacik, Metin and Janse, Mark},
  booktitle    = {Contact morphology in modern Greek dialects},
  editor       = {Ralli, Angela},
  isbn         = {978-1-4438-8691-8},
  keywords     = {Language Contact,Language Change,Adjective,Reduplication,Modern Greek,Asia Minor Greek,Armenian,Cappadocian,Turkish},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {179--209},
  publisher    = {Cambridge Scholars Publishing},
  title        = {Reduplication with fixed segmentism in Cappadocian and Armenian as a contact-induced phenomenon},
  year         = {2016},
}