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The paradox of women's advantage in cultural capital: a micro- and macro-sociological perspective

Susan Lagaert (UGent) and Henk Roose (UGent)
Author
Organization
Project
Gender inequality and cultural consumption: a macro-sociological, longitudinal and cross-national comparative perspective (FWO)
Abstract
Cultural consumption research consistently indicates that women participate more in highbrow cultural activities than men and links this female advantage in cultural capital to the idea that women are responsible for cultural reproduction. Paradoxically, time-use studies find that women’s free time is often constrained – especially when they have children– because of inequalities in the division of (un)paid labor. Moreover, the impact of the macro-level, structural division of labor which provides the opportunity structure and normative context for women’s cultural consumption remains unexplored. Using multilevel analyses on Eurobarometer data, we find evidence for both cultural reproduction ideas and time scarcity hypotheses. While a female advantage exists in both book reading and theatre attendance, the gendered impact of having children differs between both activities. Also at the macro-level different processes are at play for both practices. While the structural division of (un)paid labor is not related to the gender gap in theatre attendance, macro-level equality is related to higher female participation in book reading and thus, a larger gender gap at the individual level. So, our results give evidence for a ‘cultural lag’ in which women’s cultural behavior lags behind structural improvements in their position.
Keywords
division of labor, multilevel analysis, cultural capital, gender, highbrow cultural consumption, cross-national comparison

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Lagaert, Susan, and Henk Roose. “The Paradox of Women’s Advantage in Cultural Capital: a Micro- and Macro-sociological Perspective.” American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Abstracts. 2015. Print.
APA
Lagaert, S., & Roose, H. (2015). The paradox of women’s advantage in cultural capital: a micro- and macro-sociological perspective. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Abstracts. Presented at the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.
Chicago author-date
Lagaert, Susan, and Henk Roose. 2015. “The Paradox of Women’s Advantage in Cultural Capital: a Micro- and Macro-sociological Perspective.” In American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lagaert, Susan, and Henk Roose. 2015. “The Paradox of Women’s Advantage in Cultural Capital: a Micro- and Macro-sociological Perspective.” In American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
Lagaert S, Roose H. The paradox of women’s advantage in cultural capital: a micro- and macro-sociological perspective. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Abstracts. 2015.
IEEE
[1]
S. Lagaert and H. Roose, “The paradox of women’s advantage in cultural capital: a micro- and macro-sociological perspective,” in American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Abstracts, Chicago, USA, 2015.
@inproceedings{7034931,
  abstract     = {Cultural consumption research consistently indicates that women participate more in highbrow cultural activities than men and links this female advantage in cultural capital to the idea that women are responsible for cultural reproduction. Paradoxically, time-use studies find that women’s free time is often constrained – especially when they have children– because of inequalities in the division of (un)paid labor. Moreover, the impact of the macro-level, structural division of labor which provides the opportunity structure and normative context for women’s cultural consumption remains unexplored. Using multilevel analyses on Eurobarometer data, we find evidence for both cultural reproduction ideas and time scarcity hypotheses. While a female advantage exists in both book reading and theatre attendance, the gendered impact of having children differs between both activities. Also at the macro-level different processes are at play for both practices. While the structural division of (un)paid labor is not related to the gender gap in theatre attendance, macro-level equality is related to higher female participation in book reading and thus, a larger gender gap at the individual level. So, our results give evidence for a ‘cultural lag’ in which women’s cultural behavior lags behind structural improvements in their position.},
  author       = {Lagaert, Susan and Roose, Henk},
  booktitle    = {American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Abstracts},
  keywords     = {division of labor,multilevel analysis,cultural capital,gender,highbrow cultural consumption,cross-national comparison},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Chicago, USA},
  title        = {The paradox of women's advantage in cultural capital: a micro- and macro-sociological perspective},
  year         = {2015},
}