Advanced search
1 file | 511.37 KB
Author
Organization
Abstract
Comprising some thirty to forty million people, the Kurds constitute the fourth largest ethnicity in Western Asia. Divided between Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and Syria, Kurdistan is located in the northern part of the Middle East. A sense of national belonging among the Kurds emerged during the course of the twentieth century; it was late and weak by comparison to nationalism among the neighboring Turks, Arabs, and Persians. After the disintegration of the Ottoman empire and the establishment of a new state system in the region from which Turkey, Syria, and Iraq emerged, the Kurds living in those states rebelled on many occasions against physical and cultural genocide. The main Kurdish political actors today are the Kurdistan Regional Government in the north of Iraq, a product of a power-sharing agreement between the Kurdistan Democratic Party and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan; the Kurdistan Workers' Party; and the affiliated Democratic Union Party.

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 511.37 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Jongerden, Joost, and Ahmet Hamdi Akkaya. 2016. “Kurds and the PKK.” In The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism, ed. John Stone, Rutledge M Dennis, Polly S Rizova, Anthony D Smith, and Xiaoshuo Hou, 1258–1263. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley Blackwell.
APA
Jongerden, J., & Akkaya, A. H. (2016). Kurds and the PKK. In John Stone, R. M. Dennis, P. S. Rizova, A. D. Smith, & X. Hou (Eds.), The Wiley Blackwell encyclopedia of race, ethnicity, and nationalism (pp. 1258–1263). Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley Blackwell.
Vancouver
1.
Jongerden J, Akkaya AH. Kurds and the PKK. In: Stone J, Dennis RM, Rizova PS, Smith AD, Hou X, editors. The Wiley Blackwell encyclopedia of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley Blackwell; 2016. p. 1258–63.
MLA
Jongerden, Joost, and Ahmet Hamdi Akkaya. “Kurds and the PKK.” The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism. Ed. John Stone et al. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley Blackwell, 2016. 1258–1263. Print.
@incollection{7033709,
  abstract     = {Comprising some thirty to forty million people, the Kurds constitute the fourth largest ethnicity in Western Asia. Divided between Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and Syria, Kurdistan is located in the northern part of the Middle East. A sense of national belonging among the Kurds emerged during the course of the twentieth century; it was late and weak by comparison to nationalism among the neighboring Turks, Arabs, and Persians. After the disintegration of the Ottoman empire and the establishment of a new state system in the region from which Turkey, Syria, and Iraq emerged, the Kurds living in those states rebelled on many occasions against physical and cultural genocide. The main Kurdish political actors today are the Kurdistan Regional Government in the north of Iraq, a product of a power-sharing agreement between the Kurdistan Democratic Party and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan; the Kurdistan Workers' Party; and the affiliated Democratic Union Party.},
  author       = {Jongerden, Joost and Akkaya, Ahmet Hamdi},
  booktitle    = {The Wiley Blackwell encyclopedia of race, ethnicity, and nationalism},
  editor       = {Stone, John and Dennis, Rutledge M and Rizova, Polly S and Smith, Anthony D and Hou, Xiaoshuo},
  isbn         = {9781405189781},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1258--1263},
  publisher    = {Wiley Blackwell},
  title        = {Kurds and the PKK},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118663202.wberen026},
  year         = {2016},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric