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A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices

(2009) OPTICS EXPRESS. 17(13). p.10895-10909
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Abstract
An efficient full-vectorial finite element beam propagation method is presented that uses higher order vector elements to calculate the wide angle propagation of an optical field through inhomogeneous, anisotropic optical materials such as liquid crystals. The full dielectric permittivity tensor is considered in solving Maxwell's equations. The wide applicability of the method is illustrated with different examples: the propagation of a laser beam in a uniaxial medium, the tunability of a directional coupler based on liquid crystals and the near-field diffraction of a plane wave in a structure containing micrometer scale variations in the transverse refractive index, similar to the pixels of a spatial light modulator. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America
Keywords
Finite Element Method, Optics, Liquid Crystals, OPTICAL WAVE-GUIDES, Photonics, LIGHT

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MLA
Vanbrabant, Pieter, et al. “A Finite Element Beam Propagation Method for Simulation of Liquid Crystal Devices.” OPTICS EXPRESS, vol. 17, no. 13, 2009, pp. 10895–909, doi:10.1364/OE.17.010895.
APA
Vanbrabant, P., Beeckman, J., Neyts, K., James, R., & Fernandez, F. A. (2009). A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices. OPTICS EXPRESS, 17(13), 10895–10909. https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.010895
Chicago author-date
Vanbrabant, Pieter, Jeroen Beeckman, Kristiaan Neyts, Richard James, and F. Anibal Fernandez. 2009. “A Finite Element Beam Propagation Method for Simulation of Liquid Crystal Devices.” OPTICS EXPRESS 17 (13): 10895–909. https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.010895.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vanbrabant, Pieter, Jeroen Beeckman, Kristiaan Neyts, Richard James, and F. Anibal Fernandez. 2009. “A Finite Element Beam Propagation Method for Simulation of Liquid Crystal Devices.” OPTICS EXPRESS 17 (13): 10895–10909. doi:10.1364/OE.17.010895.
Vancouver
1.
Vanbrabant P, Beeckman J, Neyts K, James R, Fernandez FA. A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices. OPTICS EXPRESS. 2009;17(13):10895–909.
IEEE
[1]
P. Vanbrabant, J. Beeckman, K. Neyts, R. James, and F. A. Fernandez, “A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices,” OPTICS EXPRESS, vol. 17, no. 13, pp. 10895–10909, 2009.
@article{703140,
  abstract     = {An efficient full-vectorial finite element beam propagation method is presented that uses higher order vector elements to calculate the wide angle propagation of an optical field through inhomogeneous, anisotropic optical materials such as liquid crystals. The full dielectric permittivity tensor is considered in solving Maxwell's equations. The wide applicability of the method is illustrated with different examples: the propagation of a laser beam in a uniaxial medium, the tunability of a directional coupler based on liquid crystals and the near-field diffraction of a plane wave in a structure containing micrometer scale variations in the transverse refractive index, similar to the pixels of a spatial light modulator. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America},
  author       = {Vanbrabant, Pieter and Beeckman, Jeroen and Neyts, Kristiaan and James, Richard and Fernandez, F. Anibal},
  issn         = {1094-4087},
  journal      = {OPTICS EXPRESS},
  keywords     = {Finite Element Method,Optics,Liquid Crystals,OPTICAL WAVE-GUIDES,Photonics,LIGHT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13},
  pages        = {10895--10909},
  title        = {A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.010895},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}

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