Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Hierarchy of impairment of spinal mobility measures in ankylosing spondylitis: twelve-year data

Sofia Ramiro, Robert BM Landewé, Désirée van der Heijde, Carmen Stolwijk, Maxime Dougados, Filip Van den Bosch UGent and Astrid van Tubergen (2015) ARTHRITIS CARE & RESEARCH. 67(11). p.1571-1577
abstract
Objective: To investigate which spinal mobility measures (SMMs) are most frequently impaired in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), whether a hierarchy of impairment can be established, and whether assessing fewer measures sufficiently captures impairment in spinal mobility. Methods: Patients from the Outcome in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Study were followed up for 12 years. SMMs were considered impaired when falling below predefined cutoffs, derived from normal individuals. The proportion of patients in whom each SMM was impaired was calculated using baseline observation. In patients with 1 impaired SMM, we investigated how often impairment in spinal mobility would be missed if only a fixed number of SMMs was assessed. Analyses were repeated using all 12-year observations. Results: A total of 216 patients were included (70% males). Lateral spinal flexion (LSF) was the most frequently impaired measure, followed by the modified Schober (mSchober) test, tragus-to-wall, cervical rotation, intermalleolar distance, and chest expansion measures, respectively. This hierarchy was strikingly consistent over time, and independent of sex, symptom duration, and presence of syndesmophytes. In patients with 1 impaired SMM, LSF was impaired most frequently (86%), followed by the mSchober test (58%). If only LSF was measured, 14% of patients with impairment in any SMM would be missed; if additionally the mSchober test was measured, 9% would be missed. Conclusion: LSF followed by the mSchober test are the most frequently impaired mobility measures in AS, reflecting an earlier involvement of the lumbar spine, followed by involvement of the thoracic and cervical spine. In clinical practice LSF and the mSchober test suffice to screen impairment in spinal mobility.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
ARTHRITIS CARE & RESEARCH
Arthritis Care Res.
volume
67
issue
11
pages
1571 - 1577
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000363688600011
JCR category
RHEUMATOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.229 (2015)
JCR rank
12/32 (2015)
JCR quartile
2 (2015)
ISSN
2151-464X
DOI
10.1002/acr.22614
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7025401
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7025401
date created
2016-01-05 14:45:31
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:34
@article{7025401,
  abstract     = {Objective: To investigate which spinal mobility measures (SMMs) are most frequently impaired in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), whether a hierarchy of impairment can be established, and whether assessing fewer measures sufficiently captures impairment in spinal mobility. 
Methods: Patients from the Outcome in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Study were followed up for 12 years. SMMs were considered impaired when falling below predefined cutoffs, derived from normal individuals. The proportion of patients in whom each SMM was impaired was calculated using baseline observation. In patients with 1 impaired SMM, we investigated how often impairment in spinal mobility would be missed if only a fixed number of SMMs was assessed. Analyses were repeated using all 12-year observations. 
Results: A total of 216 patients were included (70\% males). Lateral spinal flexion (LSF) was the most frequently impaired measure, followed by the modified Schober (mSchober) test, tragus-to-wall, cervical rotation, intermalleolar distance, and chest expansion measures, respectively. This hierarchy was strikingly consistent over time, and independent of sex, symptom duration, and presence of syndesmophytes. In patients with 1 impaired SMM, LSF was impaired most frequently (86\%), followed by the mSchober test (58\%). If only LSF was measured, 14\% of patients with impairment in any SMM would be missed; if additionally the mSchober test was measured, 9\% would be missed. 
Conclusion: LSF followed by the mSchober test are the most frequently impaired mobility measures in AS, reflecting an earlier involvement of the lumbar spine, followed by involvement of the thoracic and cervical spine. In clinical practice LSF and the mSchober test suffice to screen impairment in spinal mobility.},
  author       = {Ramiro, Sofia and Landew{\'e}, Robert BM and van der Heijde, D{\'e}sir{\'e}e and Stolwijk, Carmen and Dougados, Maxime and Van den Bosch, Filip and van Tubergen, Astrid},
  issn         = {2151-464X},
  journal      = {ARTHRITIS CARE \& RESEARCH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1571--1577},
  title        = {Hierarchy of impairment of spinal mobility measures in ankylosing spondylitis: twelve-year data},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.22614},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Ramiro, Sofia, Robert BM Landewé, Désirée van der Heijde, Carmen Stolwijk, Maxime Dougados, Filip Van den Bosch, and Astrid van Tubergen. 2015. “Hierarchy of Impairment of Spinal Mobility Measures in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Twelve-year Data.” Arthritis Care & Research 67 (11): 1571–1577.
APA
Ramiro, S., Landewé, R. B., van der Heijde, D., Stolwijk, C., Dougados, M., Van den Bosch, F., & van Tubergen, A. (2015). Hierarchy of impairment of spinal mobility measures in ankylosing spondylitis: twelve-year data. ARTHRITIS CARE & RESEARCH, 67(11), 1571–1577.
Vancouver
1.
Ramiro S, Landewé RB, van der Heijde D, Stolwijk C, Dougados M, Van den Bosch F, et al. Hierarchy of impairment of spinal mobility measures in ankylosing spondylitis: twelve-year data. ARTHRITIS CARE & RESEARCH. 2015;67(11):1571–7.
MLA
Ramiro, Sofia, Robert BM Landewé, Désirée van der Heijde, et al. “Hierarchy of Impairment of Spinal Mobility Measures in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Twelve-year Data.” ARTHRITIS CARE & RESEARCH 67.11 (2015): 1571–1577. Print.