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Enduring class struggle in Tunisia: the fight for identity beyond political Islam

Fabio Merone (UGent)
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Abstract
This article examines the emergence of Salafism and the post-Ben Ali process of institution-building through the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion that have their origin in the Bourguibian period. While Al-Nahda compromised with opposition secular parties accomplishing the integration of a moderate Islamist middle-class excluded from power since independence, continuous political mobilisation and urban revolt in parallel with the liberalisation of the public space gave birth to a new radical Islamic subject, Ansar al-Sharia, which represents disenfranchised lower classes that remain excluded from enjoying the benefits of the revolution. The article highlights how this exclusion is in continuity with Tunisia’s modern history, where the threat of radical Islamism has often been deployed to mystify social class exclusion.
Keywords
DEMOCRACY, MIDDLE-EAST

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Merone, Fabio. “Enduring Class Struggle in Tunisia: The Fight for Identity Beyond Political Islam.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES 42.1 (2015): 74–87. Print.
APA
Merone, F. (2015). Enduring class struggle in Tunisia: the fight for identity beyond political Islam. BRITISH JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES, 42(1), 74–87.
Chicago author-date
Merone, Fabio. 2015. “Enduring Class Struggle in Tunisia: The Fight for Identity Beyond Political Islam.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 42 (1): 74–87.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Merone, Fabio. 2015. “Enduring Class Struggle in Tunisia: The Fight for Identity Beyond Political Islam.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 42 (1): 74–87.
Vancouver
1.
Merone F. Enduring class struggle in Tunisia: the fight for identity beyond political Islam. BRITISH JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES. 2015;42(1):74–87.
IEEE
[1]
F. Merone, “Enduring class struggle in Tunisia: the fight for identity beyond political Islam,” BRITISH JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 74–87, 2015.
@article{7007528,
  abstract     = {{This article examines the emergence of Salafism and the post-Ben Ali process of institution-building through the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion that have their origin in the Bourguibian period. While Al-Nahda compromised with opposition secular parties accomplishing the integration of a moderate Islamist middle-class excluded from power since independence, continuous political mobilisation and urban revolt in parallel with the liberalisation of the public space gave birth to a new radical Islamic subject, Ansar al-Sharia, which
represents disenfranchised lower classes that remain excluded from enjoying the benefits of the revolution. The article highlights how this exclusion is in continuity with Tunisia’s modern history, where the threat of radical Islamism has often been deployed to mystify social class exclusion.}},
  author       = {{Merone, Fabio}},
  issn         = {{1353-0194}},
  journal      = {{BRITISH JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES}},
  keywords     = {{DEMOCRACY,MIDDLE-EAST}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{74--87}},
  title        = {{Enduring class struggle in Tunisia: the fight for identity beyond political Islam}},
  volume       = {{42}},
  year         = {{2015}},
}

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