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Decreasing risky behavior on social network sites: the impact of parental involvement in secondary education interventions

Ellen Vanderhoven (UGent) , Tammy Schellens (UGent) and Martin Valcke (UGent)
(2016) JOURNAL OF PRIMARY PREVENTION. 37(3). p.247-261
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Abstract
Teenagers face significant risks when using increasingly popular social network sites. Prevention and intervention efforts to raise awareness about these risks and to change risky behavior (so-called "e-safety" interventions) are essential for the wellbeing of these minors. However, several studies have revealed that while school interventions often affect awareness, they have only a limited impact on pupils' unsafe behavior. Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories about parental involvement, we hypothesized that involving parents in an e-safety intervention would positively influence pupils' intentions and behavior. In a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test measures involving 207 pupils in secondary education, we compared the impact of an intervention without parental involvement with one that included active parental involvement by means of a homework task. We found that whereas parental involvement was not necessary to improve the intervention's impact on risk awareness, it did change intentions to engage in certain unsafe behavior, such as posting personal and sexual information on the profile page of a social network site, and in reducing existing problematic behavior. This beneficial impact was particularly evident for boys. These findings suggest that developing prevention campaigns with active parental involvement is well worth the effort. Researchers and developers should therefore focus on other efficient strategies to involve parents.
Keywords
Media literacy, Media education, HARASSMENT, Homework, Online safety, Quasi-experimental study

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MLA
Vanderhoven, Ellen, Tammy Schellens, and Martin Valcke. “Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The Impact of Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Interventions.” JOURNAL OF PRIMARY PREVENTION 37.3 (2016): 247–261. Print.
APA
Vanderhoven, E., Schellens, T., & Valcke, M. (2016). Decreasing risky behavior on social network sites: the impact of parental involvement in secondary education interventions. JOURNAL OF PRIMARY PREVENTION, 37(3), 247–261.
Chicago author-date
Vanderhoven, Ellen, Tammy Schellens, and Martin Valcke. 2016. “Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The Impact of Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Interventions.” Journal of Primary Prevention 37 (3): 247–261.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vanderhoven, Ellen, Tammy Schellens, and Martin Valcke. 2016. “Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The Impact of Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Interventions.” Journal of Primary Prevention 37 (3): 247–261.
Vancouver
1.
Vanderhoven E, Schellens T, Valcke M. Decreasing risky behavior on social network sites: the impact of parental involvement in secondary education interventions. JOURNAL OF PRIMARY PREVENTION. 2016;37(3):247–61.
IEEE
[1]
E. Vanderhoven, T. Schellens, and M. Valcke, “Decreasing risky behavior on social network sites: the impact of parental involvement in secondary education interventions,” JOURNAL OF PRIMARY PREVENTION, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 247–261, 2016.
@article{7007303,
  abstract     = {{Teenagers face significant risks when using increasingly popular social network sites. Prevention and intervention efforts to raise awareness about these risks and to change risky behavior (so-called "e-safety" interventions) are essential for the wellbeing of these minors. However, several studies have revealed that while school interventions often affect awareness, they have only a limited impact on pupils' unsafe behavior. Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories about parental involvement, we hypothesized that involving parents in an e-safety intervention would positively influence pupils' intentions and behavior. In a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test measures involving 207 pupils in secondary education, we compared the impact of an intervention without parental involvement with one that included active parental involvement by means of a homework task. We found that whereas parental involvement was not necessary to improve the intervention's impact on risk awareness, it did change intentions to engage in certain unsafe behavior, such as posting personal and sexual information on the profile page of a social network site, and in reducing existing problematic behavior. This beneficial impact was particularly evident for boys. These findings suggest that developing prevention campaigns with active parental involvement is well worth the effort. Researchers and developers should therefore focus on other efficient strategies to involve parents.}},
  author       = {{Vanderhoven, Ellen and Schellens, Tammy and Valcke, Martin}},
  issn         = {{0278-095X}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF PRIMARY PREVENTION}},
  keywords     = {{Media literacy,Media education,HARASSMENT,Homework,Online safety,Quasi-experimental study}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{3}},
  pages        = {{247--261}},
  title        = {{Decreasing risky behavior on social network sites: the impact of parental involvement in secondary education interventions}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10935-016-0420-0}},
  volume       = {{37}},
  year         = {{2016}},
}

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