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Development of in vitro models for investigating spatially fractionated irradiation: physics and biological results

Stéphanie Blockhuys UGent, Barbara Vanhoecke UGent, LEEN PAELINCK UGent, Marc Bracke UGent and Carlos De Wagter UGent (2009) PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY. 54(6). p.1565-1578
abstract
We present different in vitro experimental models which allow us to evaluate the effect of spatially fractionated dose distributions on metabolic activity. We irradiated a monolayer of MCF-7/6 human breast cancer cells with a steep and a smooth 6 MV x-ray dose gradient. In the steep gradient model, we irradiated the cells with three separate small fields. We also developed two smooth gradient models. In the first model, the cells are cultured in a T25 flask and irradiated with a smooth dose gradient over the length of the flask, while in the second one, the cells are cultured in a 96-well plate and also irradiated over the length of the plate. In an attempt to correlate the spatially fractionated dose distributions with metabolic activity, the effect of irradiation was evaluated by means of the MTT assay. This assay is used to determine the metabolic activity by measuring the amount of formazan formed after the conversion of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) by cellular dehydrogenases. The results obtained with our different models suggest a dose-specific effect on metabolic activity, characterized by an increased formazan optical density occurring in the dose range 1.0-4.0 Gy in the steep dose gradient model and in the dose ranges 4.2-6.5 Gy and 2.3-5.1 Gy in the two smooth dose gradient models. The corresponding times for maximal formazan accumulation were 5-7 days in the steep dose gradient model and day 9-13 and day 9-11 in the smooth dose gradient models. Altogether, our results suggest that the MTT assay may be used as a biological dose-response meter to monitor the radiotherapeutic effectiveness.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
journal title
PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY
Phys. Med. Biol.
volume
54
issue
6
pages
1565 - 1578
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000263903600012
JCR category
RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
JCR impact factor
2.781 (2009)
JCR rank
25/104 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
0031-9155
DOI
10.1088/0031-9155/54/6/011
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
700355
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-700355
date created
2009-06-15 17:06:47
date last changed
2009-06-22 15:31:51
@article{700355,
  abstract     = {We present different in vitro experimental models which allow us to evaluate the effect of spatially fractionated dose distributions on metabolic activity. We irradiated a monolayer of MCF-7/6 human breast cancer cells with a steep and a smooth 6 MV x-ray dose gradient. In the steep gradient model, we irradiated the cells with three separate small fields. We also developed two smooth gradient models. In the first model, the cells are cultured in a T25 flask and irradiated with a smooth dose gradient over the length of the flask, while in the second one, the cells are cultured in a 96-well plate and also irradiated over the length of the plate. In an attempt to correlate the spatially fractionated dose distributions with metabolic activity, the effect of irradiation was evaluated by means of the MTT assay. This assay is used to determine the metabolic activity by measuring the amount of formazan formed after the conversion of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) by cellular dehydrogenases. The results obtained with our different models suggest a dose-specific effect on metabolic activity, characterized by an increased formazan optical density occurring in the dose range 1.0-4.0 Gy in the steep dose gradient model and in the dose ranges 4.2-6.5 Gy and 2.3-5.1 Gy in the two smooth dose gradient models. The corresponding times for maximal formazan accumulation were 5-7 days in the steep dose gradient model and day 9-13 and day 9-11 in the smooth dose gradient models. Altogether, our results suggest that the MTT assay may be used as a biological dose-response meter to monitor the radiotherapeutic effectiveness.},
  author       = {Blockhuys, St{\'e}phanie and Vanhoecke, Barbara and PAELINCK, LEEN and Bracke, Marc and De Wagter, Carlos},
  issn         = {0031-9155},
  journal      = {PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1565--1578},
  title        = {Development of in vitro models for investigating spatially fractionated irradiation: physics and biological results},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/54/6/011},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Blockhuys, Stéphanie, Barbara Vanhoecke, LEEN PAELINCK, Marc Bracke, and Carlos De Wagter. 2009. “Development of in Vitro Models for Investigating Spatially Fractionated Irradiation: Physics and Biological Results.” Physics in Medicine and Biology 54 (6): 1565–1578.
APA
Blockhuys, S., Vanhoecke, B., PAELINCK, L., Bracke, M., & De Wagter, C. (2009). Development of in vitro models for investigating spatially fractionated irradiation: physics and biological results. PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, 54(6), 1565–1578.
Vancouver
1.
Blockhuys S, Vanhoecke B, PAELINCK L, Bracke M, De Wagter C. Development of in vitro models for investigating spatially fractionated irradiation: physics and biological results. PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY. 2009;54(6):1565–78.
MLA
Blockhuys, Stéphanie, Barbara Vanhoecke, LEEN PAELINCK, et al. “Development of in Vitro Models for Investigating Spatially Fractionated Irradiation: Physics and Biological Results.” PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY 54.6 (2009): 1565–1578. Print.