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Can an extracorporeal glenoid aiming device be used to optimize the position of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty?

Tom Verstraeten, Bart Berghs, Alexander Van Tongel UGent, David Volders and Lieven De Wilde UGent (2015) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SHOULDER SURGERY. 9(4). p.114-120
abstract
Purpose: Successful total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) requires a correct position of the glenoid component. This study compares the accuracy of the positioning with a new developed glenoid aiming device and virtual three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scan positioning. Materials and Methods: On 39 scapulas from cadavers, a K-wire (KDev) was positioned using the glenoid aiming device. It consists of glenoid components connected to the aiming device, which cover 150 degrees of the inferior glenoid circle, has a fixed version and inclination and is available with several different radii. The aiming device is stabilized at the most medial scapular point. The K-wire is drilled from the center of the glenoid component to this most medial point. All scapulas were also scanned with CT and 3D reconstructed. A virtual K-wire (Kct) was positioned in the center of the glenoid and in the scapular plane. Several parameters were compared. Radius of the chosen glenoid component (rDev) and the virtual radius of the glenoid circle (rCT), spinal scapular length with the device (SSLdev) and virtual (SSLct), version and inclination between KDev and Kct, difference between entry point and exit point ("Matsen"-point). Results: Mean rDev: 14 mm +/- 1.7 mm and mean rCT: 13.5 mm +/- 1.6 mm. There was no significant difference between SSLdev (110.6 mm +/- 7.5 mm) and SSLct (108 mm +/- 7.5 mm). The version of KDev and Kct was -2.53 degrees and -2.17 degrees and the inclination 111.29 degrees and 111.66 degrees, respectively. The distance between the "Matsen-point" device and CT was 1.8 mm. Conclusion: This glenoid aiming device can position the K-wire on the glenoid with great accuracy and can, therefore, be helpful to position the glenoid component in TSA. The level of evidence: II.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
FINITE-ELEMENT-ANALYSIS, total shoulder arthroplasty, TOMOGRAPHY, LOCATION, three-dimensional computed tomography scan, glenoid positioning device, VERSION, Glenoid component positioning
journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SHOULDER SURGERY
Int. J. Shoulder Surg.
volume
9
issue
4
pages
114 - 120
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000363864500003
JCR category
ORTHOPEDICS
JCR impact factor
0.519 (2015)
JCR rank
66/74 (2015)
JCR quartile
4 (2015)
ISSN
0973-6042
DOI
10.4103/0973-6042.167951
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
7003044
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7003044
date created
2015-12-07 11:14:41
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:41:36
@article{7003044,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Successful total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) requires a correct position of the glenoid component. This study compares the accuracy of the positioning with a new developed glenoid aiming device and virtual three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scan positioning. 
Materials and Methods: On 39 scapulas from cadavers, a K-wire (KDev) was positioned using the glenoid aiming device. It consists of glenoid components connected to the aiming device, which cover 150 degrees of the inferior glenoid circle, has a fixed version and inclination and is available with several different radii. The aiming device is stabilized at the most medial scapular point. The K-wire is drilled from the center of the glenoid component to this most medial point. All scapulas were also scanned with CT and 3D reconstructed. A virtual K-wire (Kct) was positioned in the center of the glenoid and in the scapular plane. Several parameters were compared. Radius of the chosen glenoid component (rDev) and the virtual radius of the glenoid circle (rCT), spinal scapular length with the device (SSLdev) and virtual (SSLct), version and inclination between KDev and Kct, difference between entry point and exit point ({\textacutedbl}Matsen{\textacutedbl}-point). 
Results: Mean rDev: 14 mm +/- 1.7 mm and mean rCT: 13.5 mm +/- 1.6 mm. There was no significant difference between SSLdev (110.6 mm +/- 7.5 mm) and SSLct (108 mm +/- 7.5 mm). The version of KDev and Kct was -2.53 degrees and -2.17 degrees and the inclination 111.29 degrees and 111.66 degrees, respectively. The distance between the {\textacutedbl}Matsen-point{\textacutedbl} device and CT was 1.8 mm. 
Conclusion: This glenoid aiming device can position the K-wire on the glenoid with great accuracy and can, therefore, be helpful to position the glenoid component in TSA. The level of evidence: II.},
  author       = {Verstraeten, Tom and Berghs, Bart and Van Tongel, Alexander and Volders, David and De Wilde, Lieven},
  issn         = {0973-6042},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SHOULDER SURGERY},
  keyword      = {FINITE-ELEMENT-ANALYSIS,total shoulder arthroplasty,TOMOGRAPHY,LOCATION,three-dimensional computed tomography scan,glenoid positioning device,VERSION,Glenoid component positioning},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {114--120},
  title        = {Can an extracorporeal glenoid aiming device be used to optimize the position of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-6042.167951},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Verstraeten, Tom, Bart Berghs, Alexander Van Tongel, David Volders, and Lieven De Wilde. 2015. “Can an Extracorporeal Glenoid Aiming Device Be Used to Optimize the Position of the Glenoid Component in Total Shoulder Arthroplasty?” International Journal of Shoulder Surgery 9 (4): 114–120.
APA
Verstraeten, T., Berghs, B., Van Tongel, A., Volders, D., & De Wilde, L. (2015). Can an extracorporeal glenoid aiming device be used to optimize the position of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SHOULDER SURGERY, 9(4), 114–120.
Vancouver
1.
Verstraeten T, Berghs B, Van Tongel A, Volders D, De Wilde L. Can an extracorporeal glenoid aiming device be used to optimize the position of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SHOULDER SURGERY. 2015;9(4):114–20.
MLA
Verstraeten, Tom, Bart Berghs, Alexander Van Tongel, et al. “Can an Extracorporeal Glenoid Aiming Device Be Used to Optimize the Position of the Glenoid Component in Total Shoulder Arthroplasty?” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SHOULDER SURGERY 9.4 (2015): 114–120. Print.