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Abstract
The research starts from the observation that the disciplines of urban planning and public health are disconnected, partly due to an ongoing institutionalization of health criteria in formal laws and regulations. As such urban planning has difficulties to deal with the growing awareness of environmental impacts and the empowerment and engagement of citizens in health related issues. The research aims to move beyond this lock-in and explores a more context-dependent and adaptive urban planning perspective regarding environmental health. It builds on a matrix of planning management approaches, reflecting recent ideas of co-evolutionary and adaptive planning in a complex network society. To verify whether these academic and theoretical insights are useful in analyzing and solving urban environmental health conflicts, the matrix will be tested in several case studies in the city of Ghent. These are selected by means of an environmental justice approach, using a GIS analysis to compare the distribution of environmental impacts (air pollution and noise) with vulnerability (socio-economic characteristics) and responsibility (e.g. car ownership) indicators, allowing the detection of spatial inequalities. In the cases more detailed information about the context will be assembled, including bottom-up, subjective aspects, and the processes behind the inequalities. Consequently the justice of the situation can be assessed, and if deemed necessary, a redevelopment track can be devised making use of a combination of the four planning management approaches. Based on the case study results the research will formulate some recommendations how the use of the matrix could practically support a change in paradigm.
Keywords
urban planning, public health, co-evolution, adaptive planning

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Verbeek, Thomas. 2015. “Rethinking Urban Planning and Health.” In AESOP Annual Congress 2015 : Definite Space : Fuzzy Responsibility. AESOP.
APA
Verbeek, T. (2015). Rethinking urban planning and health. AESOP Annual Congress 2015 : Definite space : fuzzy responsibility. Presented at the AESOP Annual Congress 2015 : Definite space : fuzzy responsibility, AESOP.
Vancouver
1.
Verbeek T. Rethinking urban planning and health. AESOP Annual Congress 2015 : Definite space : fuzzy responsibility. AESOP; 2015.
MLA
Verbeek, Thomas. “Rethinking Urban Planning and Health.” AESOP Annual Congress 2015 : Definite Space : Fuzzy Responsibility. AESOP, 2015. Print.
@inproceedings{7000942,
  abstract     = {The research starts from the observation that the disciplines of urban planning and public health are disconnected, partly due to an ongoing institutionalization of health criteria in formal laws and regulations. As such urban planning has difficulties to deal with the growing awareness of environmental impacts and the empowerment and engagement of citizens in health related issues. The research aims to move beyond this lock-in and explores a more context-dependent and adaptive urban planning perspective regarding environmental health. It builds on a matrix of planning management approaches, reflecting recent ideas of co-evolutionary and adaptive planning in a complex network society. To verify whether these academic and theoretical insights are useful in analyzing and solving urban environmental health conflicts, the matrix will be tested in several case studies in the city of Ghent. These are selected by means of an environmental justice approach, using a GIS analysis to compare the distribution of environmental impacts (air pollution and noise) with vulnerability (socio-economic characteristics) and responsibility (e.g. car ownership) indicators, allowing the detection of spatial inequalities. In the cases more detailed information about the context will be assembled, including bottom-up, subjective aspects, and the processes behind the inequalities. Consequently the justice of the situation can be assessed, and if deemed necessary, a redevelopment track can be devised making use of a combination of the four planning management approaches. Based on the case study results the research will formulate some recommendations how the use of the matrix could practically support a change in paradigm.},
  author       = {Verbeek, Thomas},
  booktitle    = {AESOP Annual Congress 2015 : Definite space : fuzzy responsibility},
  keyword      = {urban planning,public health,co-evolution,adaptive planning},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Prague},
  publisher    = {AESOP},
  title        = {Rethinking urban planning and health},
  url          = {http://www.aesop2015.eu/presenters/poster-instructions/list-of-posters/},
  year         = {2015},
}