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Modelling the effects of osmotic stress on tomato fruit development

Bart Van de Wal, Hans Van de Put UGent, Jochen Hanssens and Kathy Steppe UGent (2017) Acta Horticulturae. 1154. p.201-206
abstract
Whereas most high-tech tomato greenhouses focus primarily on high production yields, consumers prefer a higher quality product. Dry matter content is one of the key factors determining fruit quality, and is known to be substantially influenced by altering the salinity of the nutrient solution. While this imposed osmotic stress can improve fruit quality, this often goes hand in hand with a decrease in production due to less water accumulation in the fruit. A more thorough insight in the underlying mechanisms might contribute to a better understanding and eventually steering of this delicate balance. To achieve this deeper knowledge, we combined intensive monitoring of plant and fruit physiological variables with a model-based approach. An experiment on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. 'Dirk') was set up in a greenhouse, where two different water treatments were imposed by altering the salinity (Electric Conductivity, EC) of the substrate. Besides plant variables such as sap flow, stem diameter variation and stem water potential, fruit growth and quality parameters were measured as well. These data were then used in a recently developed virtual tomato plant and fruit model, which is capable of modelling both plant and fruit growth as well as fruit quality (sugars and acids) and xylem and phloem contribution to fruit growth, but which has not been tested under salt stressed conditions. Results did not only show that the model can be used to predict fruit growth during salt stress conditions, but also which model parameters and related plant traits are affected most. This is an important step towards a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms controlling fruit development under osmotic stress.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference (proceedingsPaper)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
water deficit, mechanistic modelling, osmotic stress, LVDT, fruit growth, plant water status, carbon relations, water relations
in
Acta Horticulturae
Acta Hort.
volume
1154
pages
6 pages
publisher
International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)
place of publication
Leuven, Belgium
conference name
Model-IT 2015
conference location
Wageningen, The Netherlands
conference start
2015-10-11
conference end
2015-10-14
DOI
10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1154.26
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
P1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6998855
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6998855
alternative location
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1154.26
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1154.26
date created
2015-12-01 17:00:27
date last changed
2017-05-17 14:16:55
@inproceedings{6998855,
  abstract     = {Whereas most high-tech tomato greenhouses focus primarily on high production yields, consumers prefer a higher quality product. Dry matter content is one of the key factors determining fruit quality, and is known to be substantially influenced by altering the salinity of the nutrient solution. While this imposed osmotic stress can improve fruit quality, this often goes hand in hand with a decrease in production due to less water accumulation in the fruit. A more thorough insight in the underlying mechanisms might contribute to a better understanding and eventually steering of this delicate balance. To achieve this deeper knowledge, we combined intensive monitoring of plant and fruit physiological variables with a model-based approach. An experiment on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. 'Dirk') was set up in a greenhouse, where two different water treatments were imposed by altering the salinity (Electric Conductivity, EC) of the substrate. Besides plant variables such as sap flow, stem diameter variation and stem water potential, fruit growth and quality parameters were measured as well. These data were then used in a recently developed virtual tomato plant and fruit model, which is capable of modelling both plant and fruit growth as well as fruit quality (sugars and acids) and xylem and phloem contribution to fruit growth, but which has not been tested under salt stressed conditions. Results did not only show that the model can be used to predict fruit growth during salt stress conditions, but also which model parameters and related plant traits are affected most. This is an important step towards a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms controlling fruit development under osmotic stress.},
  author       = {Van de Wal, Bart and Van de Put, Hans and Hanssens, Jochen and Steppe, Kathy},
  booktitle    = {Acta Horticulturae},
  keyword      = {water deficit,mechanistic modelling,osmotic stress,LVDT,fruit growth,plant water status,carbon relations,water relations},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Wageningen, The Netherlands},
  pages        = {201--206},
  publisher    = {International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)},
  title        = {Modelling the effects of osmotic stress on tomato fruit development},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1154.26},
  volume       = {1154},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Van de Wal, Bart, Hans Van de Put, Jochen Hanssens, and Kathy Steppe. 2017. “Modelling the Effects of Osmotic Stress on Tomato Fruit Development.” In Acta Horticulturae, 1154:201–206. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
APA
Van de Wal, B., Van de Put, H., Hanssens, J., & Steppe, K. (2017). Modelling the effects of osmotic stress on tomato fruit development. Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 1154, pp. 201–206). Presented at the Model-IT 2015, Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Vancouver
1.
Van de Wal B, Van de Put H, Hanssens J, Steppe K. Modelling the effects of osmotic stress on tomato fruit development. Acta Horticulturae. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS); 2017. p. 201–6.
MLA
Van de Wal, Bart, Hans Van de Put, Jochen Hanssens, et al. “Modelling the Effects of Osmotic Stress on Tomato Fruit Development.” Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 1154. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), 2017. 201–206. Print.