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X-ray fluorescence and absorption microtomography reveal tissue specific distribution of metals in Daphnia magna

Björn De Samber UGent, Geert Silversmit UGent, Tom Schoonjans UGent, Roel Evens UGent, Karel De Schamphelaere UGent, Colin Janssen UGent, Lieve Balcaen UGent, Frank Vanhaecke UGent, Bert Masschaele UGent and Luc Van Hoorebeke UGent, et al. (2009) Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop, Abstracts. p.P17-P17
abstract
Micro X-ray Fluorescence (µ-XRF) is a rapidly evolving analytical technique which allows visualizing the trace level metal distributions within a specimen in an essentially non-destructive manner. Using a laboratory µ-XRF spectrometer, ppm level detection limits can be obtained with a spatial resolution of 10-20 µm. However, at second- and third generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, detection limits at the sub-ppm level can be obtained with a potential lateral resolution level better than 100 nm. These characteristics of micro/nanobeam SR-XRF allow spatially resolved multi-element determination of major, minor and trace constituents in microscopic sub-areas and volumes within biological specimens in an essentially non-destructive/non-invasive manner. However, the complexity of performing such an experiment is often quite considerable, involving dedicated sample preparation, transportation towards and experimenting at the synchrotron facility, installing an appropriate experimental set-up and performing a thorough data analysis on large amounts of spectral data. The ecotoxicological research on Daphnia magna, a frequently used model organism for investigating the mechanisms of toxicity of metals, has often been difficult because many analytical techniques are not able to investigate trace metal distributions in a spatially resolved manner at a (sub)microscopic resolution. A laboratory µ-XRF spectrometer (EDAX Eagle III) allowed us to precharacterize the major/minor element distributions within Daphnia magna with a moderate spatial resolution of approximately 20 µm. However, synchrotron radiation micro-XRF experiments were necessary (Beamline L, HASYLAB) with substantially increased elemental sensitivities to “virtually dissect” the tissue specific Zn accumulation within Daphnia magna. This work demonstrates the use of combined X-ray techniques, including two-dimensional (2D) micro-XRF, XRF micro-CT, confocal micro-XRF and absorption microtomography under conventional and cryogenic sample environments.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
synchrotron, xrf, ecotoxicology, Daphnia magna
in
Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop, Abstracts
pages
P17 - P17
conference name
Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop (SyNeW) 2009
conference location
Brussels, Belgium
conference start
2009-04-23
conference end
2009-04-23
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
699207
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-699207
date created
2009-06-15 12:32:45
date last changed
2010-06-29 12:15:37
@inproceedings{699207,
  abstract     = {Micro X-ray Fluorescence ({\textmu}-XRF) is a rapidly evolving analytical technique which allows visualizing the trace level metal distributions within a specimen in an essentially non-destructive manner. Using a laboratory {\textmu}-XRF spectrometer, ppm level detection limits can be obtained with a spatial resolution of 10-20 {\textmu}m. However, at second- and third generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, detection limits at the sub-ppm level can be obtained with a potential lateral resolution level better than 100 nm. 
These characteristics of micro/nanobeam SR-XRF allow spatially resolved multi-element determination of major, minor and trace constituents in microscopic sub-areas and volumes within biological specimens in an essentially non-destructive/non-invasive manner. However, the complexity of performing such an experiment is often quite considerable, involving dedicated sample preparation, transportation towards and experimenting at the synchrotron facility, installing an appropriate experimental set-up and performing a thorough data analysis on large amounts of spectral data.
The ecotoxicological research on Daphnia magna, a frequently used model organism for investigating the mechanisms of toxicity of metals, has often been difficult because many analytical techniques are not able to investigate trace metal distributions in a spatially resolved manner at a (sub)microscopic resolution. A laboratory {\textmu}-XRF spectrometer (EDAX Eagle III) allowed us to precharacterize the major/minor element distributions within Daphnia magna with a moderate spatial resolution of approximately 20 {\textmu}m. However, synchrotron radiation micro-XRF experiments were necessary (Beamline L, HASYLAB) with substantially increased elemental sensitivities to {\textquotedblleft}virtually dissect{\textquotedblright} the tissue specific Zn accumulation within Daphnia magna. This work demonstrates the use of combined X-ray techniques, including two-dimensional (2D) micro-XRF, XRF micro-CT, confocal micro-XRF and absorption microtomography under conventional and cryogenic sample environments.},
  author       = {De Samber, Bj{\"o}rn and Silversmit, Geert and Schoonjans, Tom and Evens, Roel and De Schamphelaere, Karel and Janssen, Colin and Balcaen, Lieve and Vanhaecke, Frank and Masschaele, Bert and Van Hoorebeke, Luc and Vekemans, Bart and Wellenreuther, Gerd and Rickers, Karen and Falkenberg, Gerald and Vincze, Laszlo},
  booktitle    = {Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop, Abstracts},
  keyword      = {synchrotron,xrf,ecotoxicology,Daphnia magna},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brussels, Belgium},
  pages        = {P17--P17},
  title        = {X-ray fluorescence and absorption microtomography reveal tissue specific distribution of metals in Daphnia magna},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
De Samber, Björn, Geert Silversmit, Tom Schoonjans, Roel Evens, Karel De Schamphelaere, Colin Janssen, Lieve Balcaen, et al. 2009. “X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Microtomography Reveal Tissue Specific Distribution of Metals in Daphnia Magna.” In Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop, Abstracts, P17–P17.
APA
De Samber, B., Silversmit, G., Schoonjans, T., Evens, R., De Schamphelaere, K., Janssen, C., Balcaen, L., et al. (2009). X-ray fluorescence and absorption microtomography reveal tissue specific distribution of metals in Daphnia magna. Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop, Abstracts (pp. P17–P17). Presented at the Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop (SyNeW) 2009.
Vancouver
1.
De Samber B, Silversmit G, Schoonjans T, Evens R, De Schamphelaere K, Janssen C, et al. X-ray fluorescence and absorption microtomography reveal tissue specific distribution of metals in Daphnia magna. Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop, Abstracts. 2009. p. P17–P17.
MLA
De Samber, Björn, Geert Silversmit, Tom Schoonjans, et al. “X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Microtomography Reveal Tissue Specific Distribution of Metals in Daphnia Magna.” Synchrotron and Neutron Workshop, Abstracts. 2009. P17–P17. Print.