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Conflict monitoring in speech processing: an fMRI study of error detection in speech production and perception

Hanna Gauvin, Wouter De Baene UGent, Marcel Brass UGent and Robert Hartsuiker UGent (2016) NEUROIMAGE. 126. p.96-105
abstract
To minimize the number of errors in speech, and thereby facilitate communication, speech is monitored before articulation. It is, however, unclear at which level during speech production monitoring takes place, and what mechanisms are used to detect and correct errors. The present study investigated whether internal verbal monitoring takes place through the speech perception system, as proposed by perception-based theories of speech monitoring, or whether mechanisms independent of perception are applied, as proposed by production-based theories of speech monitoring. With the use of fMRI during a tongue twister task we observed that error detection in internal speech during noise-masked overt speech production and error detection in speech perception both recruit the same neural network, which includes pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), anterior insula (AI), and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although production and perception recruit similar areas, as proposed by perception-based accounts, we did not find activation in superior temporal areas (which are typically associated with speech perception) during internal speech monitoring in speech production as hypothesized by these accounts. On the contrary, results are highly compatible with a domain general approach to speech monitoring, by which internal speech monitoring takes place through detection of conflict between response options, which is subsequently resolved by a domain general executive center (e.g., the ACC).
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
speech production, self-monitoring, speech perception, conflict monitoring, verbal monitoring, fMRI
journal title
NEUROIMAGE
editor
Sonja Kotz
volume
126
pages
96 - 105
publisher
Elsevier
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000369289800009
JCR category
RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
JCR impact factor
5.835 (2016)
JCR rank
6/126 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
1053-8119
DOI
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.11.037
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6986530
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6986530
date created
2015-11-19 11:22:04
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:16
@article{6986530,
  abstract     = {To minimize the number of errors in speech, and thereby facilitate communication, speech is monitored before articulation. It is, however, unclear at which level during speech production monitoring takes place, and what mechanisms are used to detect and correct errors. The present study investigated whether internal verbal monitoring takes place through the speech perception system, as proposed by perception-based theories of speech monitoring, or whether mechanisms independent of perception are applied, as proposed by production-based theories of speech monitoring. With the use of fMRI during a tongue twister task we observed that error detection in internal speech during noise-masked overt speech production and error detection in speech perception both recruit the same neural network, which includes pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), anterior insula (AI), and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although production and perception recruit similar areas, as proposed by perception-based accounts, we did not find activation in superior temporal areas (which are typically associated with speech perception) during internal speech monitoring in speech production as hypothesized by these accounts. On the contrary, results are highly compatible with a domain general approach to speech monitoring, by which internal speech monitoring takes place through detection of conflict between response options, which is subsequently resolved by a domain general executive center (e.g., the ACC).},
  author       = {Gauvin, Hanna and De Baene, Wouter and Brass, Marcel and Hartsuiker, Robert},
  editor       = {Kotz, Sonja},
  issn         = {1053-8119},
  journal      = {NEUROIMAGE},
  keyword      = {speech production,self-monitoring,speech perception,conflict monitoring,verbal monitoring,fMRI},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {96--105},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  title        = {Conflict monitoring in speech processing: an fMRI study of error detection in speech production and perception},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.11.037},
  volume       = {126},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Gauvin, Hanna, Wouter De Baene, Marcel Brass, and Robert Hartsuiker. 2016. “Conflict Monitoring in Speech Processing: An fMRI Study of Error Detection in Speech Production and Perception.” Ed. Sonja Kotz. Neuroimage 126: 96–105.
APA
Gauvin, H., De Baene, W., Brass, M., & Hartsuiker, R. (2016). Conflict monitoring in speech processing: an fMRI study of error detection in speech production and perception. (S. Kotz, Ed.)NEUROIMAGE, 126, 96–105.
Vancouver
1.
Gauvin H, De Baene W, Brass M, Hartsuiker R. Conflict monitoring in speech processing: an fMRI study of error detection in speech production and perception. Kotz S, editor. NEUROIMAGE. Elsevier; 2016;126:96–105.
MLA
Gauvin, Hanna, Wouter De Baene, Marcel Brass, et al. “Conflict Monitoring in Speech Processing: An fMRI Study of Error Detection in Speech Production and Perception.” Ed. Sonja Kotz. NEUROIMAGE 126 (2016): 96–105. Print.