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The neural representation of extensively trained ordered sequences

Filip Van Opstal (UGent) , Wim Fias (UGent) , Philippe Peigneux and Tom Verguts (UGent)
(2009) NEUROIMAGE. 47(1). p.367-375
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Abstract
The role of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in number processing is largely agreed on. A current debate however concerns the specificity of the involvement of the IPS in representing numbers or ordinal sequences more generally. To test this specificity, we investigated whether the IPS would be activated by extensive training on an arbitrary ordered sequence. We found that the hippocampal-angular gyrus activation initially involved in learning the ordered sequences extends with extensive training to the left inferior frontal gyrus (left IFG), but not to the IPS. These results suggest that left IFG is a good candidate to process ordinal information, and that there is no need for an IPS area specifically dedicated to the representation of all ordinal sequences. Instead, we propose that the locus of the representation might be determined by the nature of the stimuli rather than its ordinal nature per se.
Keywords
ordinal sequences, inferior frontal gyrus, intraparietal sulcus, transitive inference

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Van Opstal, Filip et al. “The Neural Representation of Extensively Trained Ordered Sequences.” NEUROIMAGE 47.1 (2009): 367–375. Print.
APA
Van Opstal, F., Fias, W., Peigneux, P., & Verguts, T. (2009). The neural representation of extensively trained ordered sequences. NEUROIMAGE, 47(1), 367–375.
Chicago author-date
Van Opstal, Filip, Wim Fias, Philippe Peigneux, and Tom Verguts. 2009. “The Neural Representation of Extensively Trained Ordered Sequences.” Neuroimage 47 (1): 367–375.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Opstal, Filip, Wim Fias, Philippe Peigneux, and Tom Verguts. 2009. “The Neural Representation of Extensively Trained Ordered Sequences.” Neuroimage 47 (1): 367–375.
Vancouver
1.
Van Opstal F, Fias W, Peigneux P, Verguts T. The neural representation of extensively trained ordered sequences. NEUROIMAGE. San Diego ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE; 2009;47(1):367–75.
IEEE
[1]
F. Van Opstal, W. Fias, P. Peigneux, and T. Verguts, “The neural representation of extensively trained ordered sequences,” NEUROIMAGE, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 367–375, 2009.
@article{698570,
  abstract     = {The role of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in number processing is largely agreed on. A current debate however concerns the specificity of the involvement of the IPS in representing numbers or ordinal sequences more generally. To test this specificity, we investigated whether the IPS would be activated by extensive training on an arbitrary ordered sequence. We found that the hippocampal-angular gyrus activation initially involved in learning the ordered sequences extends with extensive training to the left inferior frontal gyrus (left IFG), but not to the IPS. These results suggest that left IFG is a good candidate to process ordinal information, and that there is no need for an IPS area specifically dedicated to the representation of all ordinal sequences. Instead, we propose that the locus of the representation might be determined by the nature of the stimuli rather than its ordinal nature per se.},
  author       = {Van Opstal, Filip and Fias, Wim and Peigneux, Philippe and Verguts, Tom},
  issn         = {1053-8119},
  journal      = {NEUROIMAGE},
  keywords     = {ordinal sequences,inferior frontal gyrus,intraparietal sulcus,transitive inference},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {367--375},
  publisher    = {ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE},
  title        = {The neural representation of extensively trained ordered sequences},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.04.035},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2009},
}

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