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Phosphorus mining for ecological restoration on former agricultural land

Stephanie Schelfhout UGent, An De Schrijver UGent, Sara De Bolle, Leen De Gelder UGent, Andreas Demey, Tom Du Pré UGent, Stefaan De Neve UGent, Geert Haesaert UGent, Kris Verheyen UGent and Jan Mertens UGent (2015) RESTORATION ECOLOGY. 23(6). p.842-851
abstract
To restore species-rich terrestrial ecosystems on ex-agricultural land, establishing nutrient limitation for dominant plant growth is essential, because in nutrient-rich soils, fast-growing species often exclude target species. However N-limitation is easier to achieve than P-limitation (because of a difference in biogeochemical behavior), biodiversity is generally highest under P-limitation. Commonly-used restoration methods to achieve low soil P-concentrations are either very expensive or take a very long time. A promising restoration technique is P-mining, an adjusted agricultural technique that aims at depleting soil-P. High biomass production and hence high P-removal with biomass is obtained by fertilizing with nutrients other than P. A pot experiment was set up to study P-mining with Lolium perenne L. on sandy soils with varying P-concentrations: from an intensively-used agricultural soil to a soil near the soil P-target for species-rich Nardus grassland. All pots received N- and K-fertilization. The effects of biostimulants on P-uptake were also assessed by the addition of arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomus spp.), humic substances or phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas spp.). In our P-rich soil (111 μg POlsen/g), P-removal rate was high but bioavailable soil-P did not decrease. At lower soil P-concentrations (64 and 36 μg POlsen/g), bioavailable soil-P had decreased but the P-removal rate had by then dropped 60% despite N- and K-fertilization and despite that the target (< 10 μg POlsen/g) was still far away. None of the biostimulants altered this trajectory. Therefore, restoration will still take decades when starting with ex-agricultural soils unless P-fertilization history was much lower than average.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
humic substances, nardus grassland, phosphate-solubilizing bacteria, phytoextraction, arbuscular mycorrhiza, plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria, PHOSPHATE-SOLUBILIZING BACTERIA, ARBUSCULAR-MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI, PLANT-SPECIES LOSS, SOIL-PHOSPHORUS, NUTRIENT-UPTAKE, HUMIC-ACID, FERTILIZER APPLICATION, NITROGEN ENRICHMENT, EUROPEAN GRASSLANDS, CROP YIELD
journal title
RESTORATION ECOLOGY
Restor. Ecol.
volume
23
issue
6
pages
842 - 851
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000363671300014
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.891 (2015)
JCR rank
72/149 (2015)
JCR quartile
2 (2015)
ISSN
1061-2971
DOI
10.1111/rec.12264
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6979097
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6979097
date created
2015-11-11 12:41:25
date last changed
2017-03-21 12:48:03
@article{6979097,
  abstract     = {To restore species-rich terrestrial ecosystems on ex-agricultural land, establishing nutrient limitation for dominant plant growth is essential, because in nutrient-rich soils, fast-growing species often exclude target species. However N-limitation is easier to achieve than P-limitation (because of a difference in biogeochemical behavior), biodiversity is generally highest under P-limitation. Commonly-used restoration methods to achieve low soil P-concentrations are either very expensive or take a very long time. A promising restoration technique is P-mining, an adjusted agricultural technique that aims at depleting soil-P. High biomass production and hence high P-removal with biomass is obtained by fertilizing with nutrients other than P. A pot experiment was set up to study P-mining with Lolium perenne L. on sandy soils with varying P-concentrations: from an intensively-used agricultural soil to a soil near the soil P-target for species-rich Nardus grassland. All pots received N- and K-fertilization. The effects of biostimulants on P-uptake were also assessed by the addition of arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomus spp.), humic substances or phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas spp.). In our P-rich soil (111 \ensuremath{\mu}g POlsen/g), P-removal rate was high but bioavailable soil-P did not decrease. At lower soil P-concentrations (64 and 36 \ensuremath{\mu}g POlsen/g), bioavailable soil-P had decreased but the P-removal rate had by then dropped 60\% despite N- and K-fertilization and despite that the target ({\textlangle} 10 \ensuremath{\mu}g POlsen/g) was still far away. None of the biostimulants altered this trajectory. Therefore, restoration will still take decades when starting with ex-agricultural soils unless P-fertilization history was much lower than average.},
  author       = {Schelfhout, Stephanie and De Schrijver, An and De Bolle, Sara and De Gelder, Leen and Demey, Andreas and Du Pr{\'e}, Tom and De Neve, Stefaan and Haesaert, Geert and Verheyen, Kris and Mertens, Jan},
  issn         = {1061-2971},
  journal      = {RESTORATION ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {humic substances,nardus grassland,phosphate-solubilizing bacteria,phytoextraction,arbuscular mycorrhiza,plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria,PHOSPHATE-SOLUBILIZING BACTERIA,ARBUSCULAR-MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI,PLANT-SPECIES LOSS,SOIL-PHOSPHORUS,NUTRIENT-UPTAKE,HUMIC-ACID,FERTILIZER APPLICATION,NITROGEN ENRICHMENT,EUROPEAN GRASSLANDS,CROP YIELD},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {842--851},
  title        = {Phosphorus mining for ecological restoration on former agricultural land},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rec.12264},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Schelfhout, Stephanie, An De Schrijver, Sara De Bolle, Leen De Gelder, Andreas Demey, Tom Du Pré, Stefaan De Neve, Geert Haesaert, Kris Verheyen, and Jan Mertens. 2015. “Phosphorus Mining for Ecological Restoration on Former Agricultural Land.” Restoration Ecology 23 (6): 842–851.
APA
Schelfhout, S., De Schrijver, A., De Bolle, S., De Gelder, L., Demey, A., Du Pré, T., De Neve, S., et al. (2015). Phosphorus mining for ecological restoration on former agricultural land. RESTORATION ECOLOGY, 23(6), 842–851.
Vancouver
1.
Schelfhout S, De Schrijver A, De Bolle S, De Gelder L, Demey A, Du Pré T, et al. Phosphorus mining for ecological restoration on former agricultural land. RESTORATION ECOLOGY. 2015;23(6):842–51.
MLA
Schelfhout, Stephanie, An De Schrijver, Sara De Bolle, et al. “Phosphorus Mining for Ecological Restoration on Former Agricultural Land.” RESTORATION ECOLOGY 23.6 (2015): 842–851. Print.