Advanced search
1 file | 713.72 KB

Perfringolysin O : the underrated Clostridium perfringens toxin?

Stefanie Verherstraeten (UGent) , Evy Goossens (UGent) , Bonnie Valgaeren (UGent) , Bart Pardon (UGent) , Leen Timbermont (UGent) , Freddy Haesebrouck (UGent) , Richard Ducatelle (UGent) , Piet Deprez (UGent) , Kristin R Wade, Rodney Tweten, et al.
(2015) TOXINS. 7(5). p.1702-1721
Author
Organization
Abstract
The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as theta toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250-300 angstrom in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.
Keywords
INTRAVENOUS-INJECTION MODEL, TRANSMEMBRANE BETA-HAIRPINS, CHOLESTEROL-DEPENDENT CYTOLYSIN, THIOL-ACTIVATED CYTOLYSIN, MEDIATED GAS-GANGRENE, PORE-FORMING TOXINS, THETA-TOXIN, ALPHA-TOXIN, PHOSPHOLIPASE-C, ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS

Downloads

  • toxins-07-01702.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 713.72 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Verherstraeten, Stefanie, Evy Goossens, Bonnie Valgaeren, Bart Pardon, Leen Timbermont, Freddy Haesebrouck, Richard Ducatelle, et al. 2015. “Perfringolysin O : the Underrated Clostridium Perfringens Toxin?” Toxins 7 (5): 1702–1721.
APA
Verherstraeten, Stefanie, Goossens, E., Valgaeren, B., Pardon, B., Timbermont, L., Haesebrouck, F., Ducatelle, R., et al. (2015). Perfringolysin O : the underrated Clostridium perfringens toxin? TOXINS, 7(5), 1702–1721.
Vancouver
1.
Verherstraeten S, Goossens E, Valgaeren B, Pardon B, Timbermont L, Haesebrouck F, et al. Perfringolysin O : the underrated Clostridium perfringens toxin? TOXINS. 2015;7(5):1702–21.
MLA
Verherstraeten, Stefanie, Evy Goossens, Bonnie Valgaeren, et al. “Perfringolysin O : the Underrated Clostridium Perfringens Toxin?” TOXINS 7.5 (2015): 1702–1721. Print.
@article{6969038,
  abstract     = {The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as theta toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250-300 angstrom in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.},
  author       = {Verherstraeten, Stefanie and Goossens, Evy and Valgaeren, Bonnie and Pardon, Bart and Timbermont, Leen and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Ducatelle, Richard and Deprez, Piet and Wade, Kristin R and Tweten, Rodney and Van Immerseel, Filip},
  issn         = {2072-6651},
  journal      = {TOXINS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1702--1721},
  title        = {Perfringolysin O : the underrated Clostridium perfringens toxin?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/toxins7051702},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2015},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: