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Preliminary data on biomarkers for selenium status in dogs

Marielle Van Zelst, Myriam Hesta UGent, Kerry Gray, Ruth Staunton, Gijs Du Laing UGent and Geert Janssens UGent (2015) Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN. p.129-129
abstract
Introduction: The current European recommended allowance for selenium (Se) in adult dogs is largely based on extrapolated data from a study in puppies. There is currently no literature on specific and sensitive biomarkers for Se adequacy in dogs and therefore the minimum Se requirement may not be accurate. In the current study, several biomarkers were assessed for their suitability to detect Se adequacy in adult dogs. These markers may then be used in future long-term trials to determine the minimum requirement of Se in adult dogs. Material and methods: Two groups of dogs were fed a semi-purified pre-feed with an adequate amount of Se (46.1 µg/MJ ME) over an 8 week period. They were then divided into two groups and fed either the same adequate Se diet or a semi-purified diet with a low Se content (6.5 µg/MJ ME, 33% of Fediaf min. rec.) for 8 weeks. Weekly urine, blood and hair growth samples were collected. The difference between the diets was measured based on the urinary Se:creatinine (CT) ratio, whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx), hair growth, mRNA expression of 10 Se related genes, and serum GPx, Se, triiodothyronine to thyroxine (T3:T4) ratio, creatine kinase (CK), and copper (Cu). Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models to investigate the effects of diet, week and their interaction. A significance level of p<0.025 was used for the primary parameters whole blood GPx and urinary Se:CT and p<0.05 for all other parameters. Results and discussion: Urinary Se:CT ratio and serum Se concentration were lower in the low Se diet from week 1 onwards (adequate 32.8, low 6.1, p<0.001 and adequate 271.0, low 252.0 µg/L, p=0.030, respectively). It can be argued that urinary Se only gives an indication on the intake, but if corrected for Se intake, it shows a tendency towards a higher relative urinary Se excretion in the low Se diet in the first week (p=0.083), where after it equalizes with the excretion of the adequate diet (week 2, adequate 96.5, low 154.3, p=0.208). This may indicate a higher relative endogenous loss of Se in the first week of feeding the low Se diet. Whole blood GPx only became significantly lower in the low than in the adequate Se diet after 8 weeks (p=0.016). However, serum GPx reacted more quickly to changes in Se intake. After 6 weeks the serum GPx activity in the low Se diet was lower than in the adequate Se diet (p=0.012). The difference between whole blood and serum GPx may be due to the higher GPx activity and its variation in whole blood. Modelling the kinetics may bring further insights in the response of all parameters to changes in Se intake, but with the present statistical evaluation, T3:T4 ratio, CK, Cu, mRNA expression and hair growth data did not show significant differences between the diet types. Conclusion: Based on the linear mixed model approach, urinary Se excretion and serum Se were the most sensitive biomarkers for Se intake. Serum GPx reacted more quickly than whole blood GPx, but still much slower than serum Se.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN
pages
129 - 129
conference name
19th Congress of the European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition (ESVCN 2015)
conference location
Toulouse, France
conference start
2015-09-17
conference end
2015-09-19
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
6965213
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6965213
date created
2015-10-22 11:28:25
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:37:05
@inproceedings{6965213,
  abstract     = {Introduction: The current European recommended allowance for selenium (Se) in adult dogs is largely based on extrapolated data from a study in puppies. There is currently no literature on specific and sensitive biomarkers for Se adequacy in dogs and therefore the minimum Se requirement may not be accurate. In the current study, several biomarkers were assessed for their suitability to detect Se adequacy in adult dogs. These markers may then be used in future long-term trials to determine the minimum requirement of Se in adult dogs.
Material and methods: Two groups of dogs were fed a semi-purified pre-feed with an adequate amount of Se (46.1 {\textmu}g/MJ ME) over an 8 week period. They were then divided into two groups and fed either the same adequate Se diet or a semi-purified diet with a low Se content (6.5 {\textmu}g/MJ ME, 33\% of Fediaf min. rec.) for 8 weeks. Weekly urine, blood and hair growth samples were collected. The difference between the diets was measured based on the urinary Se:creatinine (CT) ratio, whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx), hair growth, mRNA expression of 10 Se related genes, and serum GPx, Se, triiodothyronine to thyroxine (T3:T4) ratio, creatine kinase (CK), and copper (Cu). Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models to investigate the effects of diet, week and their interaction. A significance level of p{\textlangle}0.025 was used for the primary parameters whole blood GPx and urinary Se:CT and p{\textlangle}0.05 for all other parameters.
Results and discussion: Urinary Se:CT ratio and serum Se concentration were lower in the low Se diet from week 1 onwards (adequate 32.8, low 6.1, p{\textlangle}0.001 and adequate 271.0, low 252.0 {\textmu}g/L, p=0.030, respectively). It can be argued that urinary Se only gives an indication on the intake, but if corrected for Se intake, it shows a tendency towards a higher relative urinary Se excretion in the low Se diet in the first week (p=0.083), where after it equalizes with the excretion of the adequate diet (week 2, adequate 96.5, low 154.3, p=0.208). This may indicate a higher relative endogenous loss of Se in the first week of feeding the low Se diet. Whole blood GPx only became significantly lower in the low than in the adequate Se diet after 8 weeks (p=0.016). However, serum GPx reacted more quickly to changes in Se intake. After 6 weeks the serum GPx activity in the low Se diet was lower than in the adequate Se diet (p=0.012). The difference between whole blood and serum GPx may be due to the higher GPx activity and its variation in whole blood. Modelling the kinetics may bring further insights in the response of all parameters to changes in Se intake, but with the present statistical evaluation, T3:T4 ratio, CK, Cu, mRNA expression and hair growth data did not show significant differences between the diet types.
Conclusion: Based on the linear mixed model approach, urinary Se excretion and serum Se were the most sensitive biomarkers for Se intake. Serum GPx reacted more quickly than whole blood GPx, but still much slower than serum Se.},
  author       = {Van Zelst, Marielle and Hesta, Myriam and Gray, Kerry and Staunton, Ruth and Du Laing, Gijs and Janssens, Geert},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Toulouse, France},
  pages        = {129--129},
  title        = {Preliminary data on biomarkers for selenium status in dogs},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Van Zelst, Marielle, Myriam Hesta, Kerry Gray, Ruth Staunton, Gijs Du Laing, and Geert Janssens. 2015. “Preliminary Data on Biomarkers for Selenium Status in Dogs.” In Proceedings of the 19th Congress of the ESVCN, 129–129.
APA
Van Zelst, M., Hesta, M., Gray, K., Staunton, R., Du Laing, G., & Janssens, G. (2015). Preliminary data on biomarkers for selenium status in dogs. Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN (pp. 129–129). Presented at the 19th Congress of the European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition (ESVCN 2015).
Vancouver
1.
Van Zelst M, Hesta M, Gray K, Staunton R, Du Laing G, Janssens G. Preliminary data on biomarkers for selenium status in dogs. Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN. 2015. p. 129–129.
MLA
Van Zelst, Marielle, Myriam Hesta, Kerry Gray, et al. “Preliminary Data on Biomarkers for Selenium Status in Dogs.” Proceedings of the 19th Congress of the ESVCN. 2015. 129–129. Print.