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Selenium absorption and bioactivity in dogs are affected by dietary format

Marielle Van Zelst, Myriam Hesta UGent, Kerry Gray, Lucille Alexander, Karen Beech, An Cools UGent, Gijs Du Laing UGent and Geert Janssens UGent (2015) Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN. p.65-65
abstract
Introduction: The main function of the essential trace mineral selenium (Se) is the protective effect against oxidative stress. Raw materials of dog foods vary greatly in their Se concentration and availability and canned diets are formulated with different raw materials than kibble diets. These dietary formats (canned and kibble) also undergo a different type of processing. However, the current recommendation on Se in dog foods is not format specific. Our previous in vitro study already identified dietary format (canned vs. kibble) and protein digestibility as the main determinants of in vitro Se accessibility in dog foods. The present study was designed to evaluate if these findings are reflected in in vivo Se absorption, i.e. the fraction of dietary Se that reaches the systemic circulation, and Se bioactivity, i.e. the amount of Se that can be used for incorporation into enzymes. Material and methods: Twenty-four Labrador retrievers were randomized to four balanced groups in an incomplete cross-over design in which they were fed 4 of 8 diets during 6 transition days and 29-43 experimental days. The 8 diets were commercially available and varied in format (canned or kibble) and crude protein (CP) concentration. For every format, diets with an intended concentration of 9.6, 14.3, 19.1 and 23.9 g CP/MJ ME were selected. At the end of every feeding period, blood, urine and faecal samples were collected. Blood was analysed for whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and serum Se. Urine samples were analysed for total Se and creatinine (CT) and faeces for Se. Apparent Se absorption was calculated as the percentage of Se intake that was not found in the faeces. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models to investigate the effects of actual CP intake, format and their interaction. Results and discussion: The average dietary Se content of the canned and kibble diets was 40.6 and 22.3 µg/MJ ME, respectively. Canned diets also had a higher dietary Se content in our in vitro study; 34.8 µg/MJ ME in canned (n=20) vs. 22.5 µg/MJ ME in kibble diets (n=23). This indicates that a higher dietary Se content is inherent to canned diets. Both apparent Se absorption (as % of Se intake) and urinary Se excretion corrected for the absolute amount of absorbed Se were lower in canned compared to kibble diets (p<0.001 and p<0.001, resp.). The former is in accordance with our in vitro Se accessibility findings(3). In contrast to the in vitro study, CP did not have a significant impact on Se absorption (p=0.753). The potential bioactivity was higher in canned than in kibble diets and decreased with increasing CP intake as measured by GPx (p<0.001 and p<0.001, resp.). This may be partly attributed to the higher amount of dietary Se in canned diets. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that kibble diets result in a higher percentage of apparent Se absorption, but that feeding canned diets causes a higher absolute amount of biologically active Se (in this study measured as GPx). Therefore, recommended allowances for Se should take dietary format into account.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN
pages
65 - 65
conference name
19th Congress of the European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition (ESVCN 2015)
conference location
Toulouse, France
conference start
2015-09-17
conference end
2015-09-19
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
6965170
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6965170
date created
2015-10-22 11:16:26
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:37:47
@inproceedings{6965170,
  abstract     = {Introduction: The main function of the essential trace mineral selenium (Se) is the protective effect against oxidative stress. Raw materials of dog foods vary greatly in their Se concentration and availability and canned diets are formulated with different raw materials than kibble diets. These dietary formats (canned and kibble) also undergo a different type of processing. However, the current recommendation on Se in dog foods is not format specific. Our previous in vitro study already identified dietary format (canned vs. kibble) and protein digestibility as the main determinants of in vitro Se accessibility in dog foods. The present study was designed to evaluate if these findings are reflected in in vivo Se absorption, i.e. the fraction of dietary Se that reaches the systemic circulation, and Se bioactivity, i.e. the amount of Se that can be used for incorporation into enzymes.
Material and methods: Twenty-four Labrador retrievers were randomized to four balanced groups in an incomplete cross-over design in which they were fed 4 of 8 diets during 6 transition days and 29-43 experimental days. The 8 diets were commercially available and varied in format (canned or kibble) and crude protein (CP) concentration. For every format, diets with an intended concentration of 9.6, 14.3, 19.1 and 23.9 g CP/MJ ME were selected. At the end of every feeding period, blood, urine and faecal samples were collected. Blood was analysed for whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and serum Se. Urine samples were analysed for total Se and creatinine (CT) and faeces for Se. Apparent Se absorption was calculated as the percentage of Se intake that was not found in the faeces. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models to investigate the effects of actual CP intake, format and their interaction.
Results and discussion: The average dietary Se content of the canned and kibble diets was 40.6 and 22.3 {\textmu}g/MJ ME, respectively. Canned diets also had a higher dietary Se content in our in vitro study; 34.8 {\textmu}g/MJ ME in canned (n=20) vs. 22.5 {\textmu}g/MJ ME in kibble diets (n=23). This indicates that a higher dietary Se content is inherent to canned diets. Both apparent Se absorption (as \% of Se intake) and urinary Se excretion corrected for the absolute amount of absorbed Se were lower in canned compared to kibble diets (p{\textlangle}0.001 and p{\textlangle}0.001, resp.). The former is in accordance with our in vitro Se accessibility findings(3). In contrast to the in vitro study, CP did not have a significant impact on Se absorption (p=0.753). The potential bioactivity was higher in canned than in kibble diets and decreased with increasing CP intake as measured by GPx (p{\textlangle}0.001 and p{\textlangle}0.001, resp.). This may be partly attributed to the higher amount of dietary Se in canned diets.
Conclusion: This study demonstrated that kibble diets result in a higher percentage of apparent Se absorption, but that feeding canned diets causes a higher absolute amount of biologically active Se (in this study measured as GPx). Therefore, recommended allowances for Se should take dietary format into account.},
  author       = {Van Zelst, Marielle and Hesta, Myriam and Gray, Kerry and Alexander, Lucille and Beech, Karen and Cools, An and Du Laing, Gijs and Janssens, Geert},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Toulouse, France},
  pages        = {65--65},
  title        = {Selenium absorption and bioactivity in dogs are affected by dietary format},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Van Zelst, Marielle, Myriam Hesta, Kerry Gray, Lucille Alexander, Karen Beech, An Cools, Gijs Du Laing, and Geert Janssens. 2015. “Selenium Absorption and Bioactivity in Dogs Are Affected by Dietary Format.” In Proceedings of the 19th Congress of the ESVCN, 65–65.
APA
Van Zelst, M., Hesta, M., Gray, K., Alexander, L., Beech, K., Cools, A., Du Laing, G., et al. (2015). Selenium absorption and bioactivity in dogs are affected by dietary format. Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN (pp. 65–65). Presented at the 19th Congress of the European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition (ESVCN 2015).
Vancouver
1.
Van Zelst M, Hesta M, Gray K, Alexander L, Beech K, Cools A, et al. Selenium absorption and bioactivity in dogs are affected by dietary format. Proceedings of the 19th congress of the ESVCN. 2015. p. 65–65.
MLA
Van Zelst, Marielle, Myriam Hesta, Kerry Gray, et al. “Selenium Absorption and Bioactivity in Dogs Are Affected by Dietary Format.” Proceedings of the 19th Congress of the ESVCN. 2015. 65–65. Print.