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Musculoskeletal injuries in physical education versus non-physical education teachers: a prospective study

Lennert Goossens UGent, Sien Vercruysse UGent, Greet Cardon UGent, Leen Haerens UGent, Erik Witvrouw UGent and Dirk De Clercq UGent (2016) JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES. 34(12). p.1107-1115
abstract
Physical education (PE) teachers have a physically demanding job, putting them at a considerable risk for musculoskeletal injuries. To structurally develop tailored injury prevention programmes for PE teachers, a clear understanding of the extent, characteristics and underlying factors of their musculoskeletal injuries compared to referents is necessary. Therefore, the current study prospectively followed 103 PE teachers and 58 non-PE teachers, who registered musculoskeletal injuries and time of exposure to sports participation during one school year. Pearson χ2-tests and independent samples t-tests determined significant differences between PE and non-PE teachers regarding demographics and variables possibly related to injury occurrence. PE teachers had 1.23 and non-PE teachers 0.78 injuries/teacher/school year. This difference was significantly different after adjustment for hours spent weekly on intracurricular teaching during the career and for injury history during the preceding six months (P = 0.009; OR = 0.511; 95% CI = 0.308-0.846). PE teachers' most affected body parts were the knee and the back. PE teachers had a more extensive injury history (P < 0.001), a higher work- (P < 0.001) and sport index (P < 0.001), practiced more sports (P < 0.002) and taught more extracurricular sports (P = 0.001). Future injury prevention programmes should take account for the great injury history and heavy physical load in PE teachers.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
occupational, Incidence, multisport population, SPORTS INJURIES, RISK-FACTORS, PREVENTION, DISORDERS, STUDENTS, HISTORY
journal title
JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES
J. Sports Sci.
volume
34
issue
12
pages
1107 - 1115
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000372026600002
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.539 (2016)
JCR rank
17/81 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
0264-0414
DOI
10.1080/02640414.2015.1091491
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6965079
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6965079
date created
2015-10-22 10:26:33
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:41:38
@article{6965079,
  abstract     = {Physical education (PE) teachers have a physically demanding job, putting them at a considerable risk for musculoskeletal injuries. To structurally develop tailored injury prevention programmes for PE teachers, a clear understanding of the extent, characteristics and underlying factors of their musculoskeletal injuries compared to referents is necessary. Therefore, the current study prospectively followed 103 PE teachers and 58 non-PE teachers, who registered musculoskeletal injuries and time of exposure to sports participation during one school year. Pearson \ensuremath{\chi}2-tests and independent samples t-tests determined significant differences between PE and non-PE teachers regarding demographics and variables possibly related to injury occurrence. PE teachers had 1.23 and non-PE teachers 0.78 injuries/teacher/school year. This difference was significantly different after adjustment for hours spent weekly on intracurricular teaching during the career and for injury history during the preceding six months (P = 0.009; OR = 0.511; 95\% CI = 0.308-0.846). PE teachers' most affected body parts were the knee and the back. PE teachers had a more extensive injury history (P {\textlangle} 0.001), a higher work- (P {\textlangle} 0.001) and sport index (P {\textlangle} 0.001), practiced more sports (P {\textlangle} 0.002) and taught more extracurricular sports (P = 0.001). Future injury prevention programmes should take account for the great injury history and heavy physical load in PE teachers.},
  author       = {Goossens, Lennert and Vercruysse, Sien and Cardon, Greet and Haerens, Leen and Witvrouw, Erik and De Clercq, Dirk},
  issn         = {0264-0414},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES},
  keyword      = {occupational,Incidence,multisport population,SPORTS INJURIES,RISK-FACTORS,PREVENTION,DISORDERS,STUDENTS,HISTORY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1107--1115},
  title        = {Musculoskeletal injuries in physical education versus non-physical education teachers: a prospective study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2015.1091491},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Goossens, Lennert, Sien Vercruysse, Greet Cardon, Leen Haerens, Erik Witvrouw, and Dirk De Clercq. 2016. “Musculoskeletal Injuries in Physical Education Versus Non-physical Education Teachers: a Prospective Study.” Journal of Sports Sciences 34 (12): 1107–1115.
APA
Goossens, Lennert, Vercruysse, S., Cardon, G., Haerens, L., Witvrouw, E., & De Clercq, D. (2016). Musculoskeletal injuries in physical education versus non-physical education teachers: a prospective study. JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 34(12), 1107–1115.
Vancouver
1.
Goossens L, Vercruysse S, Cardon G, Haerens L, Witvrouw E, De Clercq D. Musculoskeletal injuries in physical education versus non-physical education teachers: a prospective study. JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES. 2016;34(12):1107–15.
MLA
Goossens, Lennert, Sien Vercruysse, Greet Cardon, et al. “Musculoskeletal Injuries in Physical Education Versus Non-physical Education Teachers: a Prospective Study.” JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES 34.12 (2016): 1107–1115. Print.