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Are there differences in central coherence and set shifting across the subtypes of anorexia nervosa?: a systematic review

Sara Van Autreve (UGent) and Myriam Vervaet (UGent)
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Abstract
Anorexia nervosa (AN) has been associated with weaknesses in central coherence and set shifting. In this line, it has been proposed to directly address these neuropsychological features in treatment (e.g., cognitive remediation therapy). It is not clear, however, whether the 2 subtypes of AN, the restricting (AN-R) and bingeing/purging (AN-BP) type, have the same amount of problems in these domains. A systematic search of the literature was conducted, using the databases Web of Science and PubMed, looking for studies on the comparison of AN-R and AN-BP in performing central coherence/set-shifting tasks. Notably, very few authors describe the results of a direct comparison of the performance of patients with AN-R and AN-BP. In summary, the available indications for possible group differences are not strong enough to draw definitive conclusions.
Keywords
set shifting, central coherence, mental flexibility, attention to detail, Anorexia Nervosa, AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS, EATING-DISORDERS, BULIMIA-NERVOSA, PERSONALITY DIMENSIONS, COGNITIVE FLEXIBILITY, WEAK COHERENCE, TRAITS, ENDOPHENOTYPES, REMEDIATION, DIRECTIONS

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Citation

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Chicago
Van Autreve, Sara, and Myriam Vervaet. 2015. “Are There Differences in Central Coherence and Set Shifting Across the Subtypes of Anorexia Nervosa?: a Systematic Review.” Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 203 (10): 774–780.
APA
Van Autreve, S., & Vervaet, M. (2015). Are there differences in central coherence and set shifting across the subtypes of anorexia nervosa?: a systematic review. JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE, 203(10), 774–780.
Vancouver
1.
Van Autreve S, Vervaet M. Are there differences in central coherence and set shifting across the subtypes of anorexia nervosa?: a systematic review. JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE. 2015;203(10):774–80.
MLA
Van Autreve, Sara, and Myriam Vervaet. “Are There Differences in Central Coherence and Set Shifting Across the Subtypes of Anorexia Nervosa?: a Systematic Review.” JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE 203.10 (2015): 774–780. Print.
@article{6962996,
  abstract     = {Anorexia nervosa (AN) has been associated with weaknesses in central coherence and set shifting. In this line, it has been proposed to directly address these neuropsychological features in treatment (e.g., cognitive remediation therapy). It is not clear, however, whether the 2 subtypes of AN, the restricting (AN-R) and bingeing/purging (AN-BP) type, have the same amount of problems in these domains. A systematic search of the literature was conducted, using the databases Web of Science and PubMed, looking for studies on the comparison of AN-R and AN-BP in performing central coherence/set-shifting tasks. Notably, very few authors describe the results of a direct comparison of the performance of patients with AN-R and AN-BP. In summary, the available indications for possible group differences are not strong enough to draw definitive conclusions.},
  author       = {Van Autreve, Sara and Vervaet, Myriam},
  issn         = {0022-3018},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE},
  keyword      = {set shifting,central coherence,mental flexibility,attention to detail,Anorexia Nervosa,AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS,EATING-DISORDERS,BULIMIA-NERVOSA,PERSONALITY DIMENSIONS,COGNITIVE FLEXIBILITY,WEAK COHERENCE,TRAITS,ENDOPHENOTYPES,REMEDIATION,DIRECTIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {774--780},
  title        = {Are there differences in central coherence and set shifting across the subtypes of anorexia nervosa?: a systematic review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0000000000000366},
  volume       = {203},
  year         = {2015},
}

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