Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Protozoan cysts act as a survival niche and protective shelter for foodborne pathogenic bacteria

Ellen Lambrecht, Julie Baré, Natascha Chavatte, Wim Bert UGent, Koen Sabbe UGent and Kurt Houf UGent (2015) APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 81(16). p.5604-5612
abstract
The production of cysts, an integral part of the life cycle of many free-living protozoa, allows these organisms to survive adverse environmental conditions. Given the prevalence of free-living protozoa in food-related environments, it is hypothesized that these organisms play an important yet currently underinvestigated role in the epidemiology of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Intracystic bacterial survival is highly relevant, as this would allow bacteria to survive the stringent cleaning and disinfection measures applied in food-related environments. The present study shows that strains of widespread and important foodborne bacteria (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Listeria monocytogenes) survive inside cysts of the ubiquitous amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, even when exposed to either antibiotic treatment (100 mu g/ml gentamicin) or highly acidic conditions (pH 0.2) and resume active growth in broth media following excystment. Strain-and species-specific differences in survival periods were observed, with Salmonella enterica surviving up to 3 weeks inside amoebal cysts. Up to 53% of the cysts were infected with pathogenic bacteria, which were located in the cyst cytosol. Our study suggests that the role of free-living protozoa and especially their cysts in the persistence and epidemiology of foodborne bacterial pathogens in food-related environments may be much more important than hitherto assumed.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ACANTHAMOEBA-CASTELLANII, FREE-LIVING PROTOZOA, LEGIONELLA-PNEUMOPHILA, CAMPYLOBACTER-JEJUNI, DIVERSITY, POLYPHAGA, RESISTANCE, COCULTURE, HEALTH, TROPHOZOITES
journal title
APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
volume
81
issue
16
pages
5604 - 5612
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000358278600035
JCR category
BIOTECHNOLOGY & APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.823 (2015)
JCR rank
33/161 (2015)
JCR quartile
1 (2015)
ISSN
0099-2240
DOI
10.1128/AEM.01031-15
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6962430
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6962430
date created
2015-10-16 15:25:12
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:30
@article{6962430,
  abstract     = {The production of cysts, an integral part of the life cycle of many free-living protozoa, allows these organisms to survive adverse environmental conditions. Given the prevalence of free-living protozoa in food-related environments, it is hypothesized that these organisms play an important yet currently underinvestigated role in the epidemiology of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Intracystic bacterial survival is highly relevant, as this would allow bacteria to survive the stringent cleaning and disinfection measures applied in food-related environments. The present study shows that strains of widespread and important foodborne bacteria (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Listeria monocytogenes) survive inside cysts of the ubiquitous amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, even when exposed to either antibiotic treatment (100 mu g/ml gentamicin) or highly acidic conditions (pH 0.2) and resume active growth in broth media following excystment. Strain-and species-specific differences in survival periods were observed, with Salmonella enterica surviving up to 3 weeks inside amoebal cysts. Up to 53\% of the cysts were infected with pathogenic bacteria, which were located in the cyst cytosol. Our study suggests that the role of free-living protozoa and especially their cysts in the persistence and epidemiology of foodborne bacterial pathogens in food-related environments may be much more important than hitherto assumed.},
  author       = {Lambrecht, Ellen and Bar{\'e}, Julie and Chavatte, Natascha and Bert, Wim and Sabbe, Koen and Houf, Kurt},
  issn         = {0099-2240},
  journal      = {APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {ACANTHAMOEBA-CASTELLANII,FREE-LIVING PROTOZOA,LEGIONELLA-PNEUMOPHILA,CAMPYLOBACTER-JEJUNI,DIVERSITY,POLYPHAGA,RESISTANCE,COCULTURE,HEALTH,TROPHOZOITES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {5604--5612},
  title        = {Protozoan cysts act as a survival niche and protective shelter for foodborne pathogenic bacteria},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01031-15},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Lambrecht, Ellen, Julie Baré, Natascha Chavatte, Wim Bert, Koen Sabbe, and Kurt Houf. 2015. “Protozoan Cysts Act as a Survival Niche and Protective Shelter for Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81 (16): 5604–5612.
APA
Lambrecht, Ellen, Baré, J., Chavatte, N., Bert, W., Sabbe, K., & Houf, K. (2015). Protozoan cysts act as a survival niche and protective shelter for foodborne pathogenic bacteria. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 81(16), 5604–5612.
Vancouver
1.
Lambrecht E, Baré J, Chavatte N, Bert W, Sabbe K, Houf K. Protozoan cysts act as a survival niche and protective shelter for foodborne pathogenic bacteria. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2015;81(16):5604–12.
MLA
Lambrecht, Ellen, Julie Baré, Natascha Chavatte, et al. “Protozoan Cysts Act as a Survival Niche and Protective Shelter for Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria.” APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 81.16 (2015): 5604–5612. Print.