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Influence of orientation and radiative heat transfer on aluminum foams in Buoyancy-induced convection

Marijn Billiet UGent, Sven De Schampheleire UGent, Henk Huisseune and Michel De Paepe UGent (2015) MATERIALS. 8(10). p.6792-6805
abstract
Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink’s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 °C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 °C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
natural convection, heat transfer, metal foam, experimental, heat sink, radiation, finned heat sink, NATURAL-CONVECTION, FORCED-CONVECTION, METAL FOAMS, FIN-ARRAYS, PLATE, SINKS, PERFORMANCE, TRANSPORT, FLOW
journal title
MATERIALS
editor
Dirk Lehmhus
volume
8
issue
10
issue title
Metal Foams: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications
pages
6792 - 6805
publisher
MDPI AG
place of publication
Basel, Switzerland
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000366825500018
JCR category
MATERIALS SCIENCE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
2.728 (2015)
JCR rank
63/271 (2015)
JCR quartile
1 (2015)
ISSN
1996-1944
DOI
10.3390/ma8105340
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6957293
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6957293
alternative location
http://www.mdpi.com/1996-1944/8/10/5340
date created
2015-10-09 11:03:40
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:54:48
@article{6957293,
  abstract     = {Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink{\textquoteright}s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 {\textdegree}C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17\%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12\% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 {\textdegree}C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10\% to 50\%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18\% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink.},
  author       = {Billiet, Marijn and De Schampheleire, Sven and Huisseune, Henk and De Paepe, Michel},
  editor       = {Lehmhus, Dirk},
  issn         = {1996-1944},
  journal      = {MATERIALS},
  keyword      = {natural convection,heat transfer,metal foam,experimental,heat sink,radiation,finned heat sink,NATURAL-CONVECTION,FORCED-CONVECTION,METAL FOAMS,FIN-ARRAYS,PLATE,SINKS,PERFORMANCE,TRANSPORT,FLOW},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {6792--6805},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  title        = {Influence of orientation and radiative heat transfer on aluminum foams in Buoyancy-induced convection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma8105340},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Billiet, Marijn, Sven De Schampheleire, Henk Huisseune, and Michel De Paepe. 2015. “Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-induced Convection.” Ed. Dirk Lehmhus. Materials 8 (10): 6792–6805.
APA
Billiet, M., De Schampheleire, S., Huisseune, H., & De Paepe, M. (2015). Influence of orientation and radiative heat transfer on aluminum foams in Buoyancy-induced convection. (D. Lehmhus, Ed.)MATERIALS, 8(10), 6792–6805.
Vancouver
1.
Billiet M, De Schampheleire S, Huisseune H, De Paepe M. Influence of orientation and radiative heat transfer on aluminum foams in Buoyancy-induced convection. Lehmhus D, editor. MATERIALS. Basel, Switzerland: MDPI AG; 2015;8(10):6792–805.
MLA
Billiet, Marijn, Sven De Schampheleire, Henk Huisseune, et al. “Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-induced Convection.” Ed. Dirk Lehmhus. MATERIALS 8.10 (2015): 6792–6805. Print.