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Eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century illustrated chapbooks of the legend of Jack the giant killer

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Abstract
A cheap, mass-produced print form of between 8 and 32 pages, chapbooks are among the most versatile media of textual transmission in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They were widely disseminated and read, both privately and communally, by a diverse readership from all social backgrounds. Even though the form is characterised by a rich diversity in genres and topics, a number of chapbook titles, often originated in oral culture, featured almost consistently in chapbook producer’s list of titles and were frequently reprinted and reissued. An example of chapbook text which appeared in a multitude of different editions is Jack the Giant Killer, the popular narrative of the strong young man defeating giants on his journeys across the British Isles. Even though narratives of this kind have often been examined in folklore studies, no systematic attempt has been made to trace the various editions and compare the textual resemblances and differences across the different versions of the same text. Illustrations in chapbooks have not been considered adequately either. In this article, I discuss the illustrations in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century chapbook editions of Jack the Giant Killer. I will consider the central role of the ornaments as a medium of visual (re)interpretation so as to determine the various ways in which this popular narrative was continuously transformed throughout the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Keywords
book history, Print culture, popular literature, chapbooks, eighteenth-century, ephemera

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Citation

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Chicago
Van De Walle, Kwinten. 2015. “Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-century Illustrated Chapbooks of the Legend of Jack the Giant Killer.” Ed. Sandro Jung. Journal of the Edinburgh Bibliographical Society 10: 109–137.
APA
Van De Walle, K. (2015). Eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century illustrated chapbooks of the legend of Jack the giant killer. (S. Jung, Ed.)JOURNAL OF THE EDINBURGH BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, 10, 109–137.
Vancouver
1.
Van De Walle K. Eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century illustrated chapbooks of the legend of Jack the giant killer. Jung S, editor. JOURNAL OF THE EDINBURGH BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. Edinburgh: Edinburgh Bibliographical Society; 2015;10:109–37.
MLA
Van De Walle, Kwinten. “Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-century Illustrated Chapbooks of the Legend of Jack the Giant Killer.” Ed. Sandro Jung. JOURNAL OF THE EDINBURGH BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY 10 (2015): 109–137. Print.
@article{6936264,
  abstract     = {A cheap, mass-produced print form of between 8 and 32 pages, chapbooks are among the most versatile media of textual transmission in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They were widely disseminated and read, both privately and communally, by a diverse readership from all social backgrounds. Even though the form is characterised by a rich diversity in genres and topics, a number of chapbook titles, often originated in oral culture, featured almost consistently in chapbook producer’s list of titles and were frequently reprinted and reissued. An example of chapbook text which appeared in a multitude of different editions is Jack the Giant Killer, the popular narrative of the strong young man defeating giants on his journeys across the British Isles. Even though narratives of this kind have often been examined in folklore studies, no systematic attempt has been made to trace the various editions and compare the textual resemblances and differences across the different versions of the same text. Illustrations in chapbooks have not been considered adequately either. In this article, I discuss the illustrations in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century chapbook editions of Jack the Giant Killer. I will consider the central role of the ornaments as a medium of visual (re)interpretation so as to determine the various ways in which this popular narrative was continuously transformed throughout the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.},
  author       = {Van De Walle, Kwinten},
  editor       = {Jung, Sandro},
  issn         = {1752-0320},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF THE EDINBURGH BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY},
  keywords     = {book history,Print culture,popular literature,chapbooks,eighteenth-century,ephemera},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {109--137},
  publisher    = {Edinburgh Bibliographical Society},
  title        = {Eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century illustrated chapbooks of the legend of Jack the giant killer},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2015},
}