Advanced search
1 file | 6.38 MB Add to list

Woodlice and millipedes in small forest fragments in Europe: possible implications for litter decomposition

Author
Organization
Abstract
Arthropods play a crucial role in the decomposition of organic matter. Soil macrofauna, such as wood lice, earth worms and millipedes, represent the first step in the process of litter decomposition on forest floors. They reduce large particles to smaller sizes and are therefore functionally important regarding nutrient cycling. In this study we focus on the distribution of woodlice and millipedes in the forest interior and edges of small forest fragments in agricultural landscapes. Arthropods were sampled using pitfalls in 224 deciduous forest fragments in 7 regions across Europe from south France to central Sweden. Woodlice and millipedes show different patterns and respond in a different way to forest edges. Woodlice were far more abundant in forest edges compared to interiors. This pattern was less clear for millipedes. Also the intensification of the surrounding landscape influences the species composition and numbers, with more individuals in more intensively used landscapes. These relatively immobile species groups show to be strong indicators for the age but less for the size of forest fragments. The differences in species composition and numbers of these important detritivores among forest patches and landscapes is discussed with respect to litter decomposition.

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 6.38 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
De Smedt, Pallieter, Willem Proesmans, Brice Giffard, et al. “Woodlice and Millipedes in Small Forest Fragments in Europe: Possible Implications for Litter Decomposition.” Sustaining Ecosystem Services in Forest Landscapes : Book of Abstracts. IUFROLE WG Conference, 2015. 44–44. Print.
APA
De Smedt, Pallieter, Proesmans, W., Giffard, B., Martin, L., Deconchat, M., Bonte, D., Brunet, J., et al. (2015). Woodlice and millipedes in small forest fragments in Europe: possible implications for litter decomposition. Sustaining ecosystem services in forest landscapes : book of abstracts (pp. 44–44). Presented at the IUFRO Landscape Ecology Working group conference: Sustaining ecosystem services in forest landscapes : concepts, research, and applications, IUFROLE WG Conference.
Chicago author-date
De Smedt, Pallieter, Willem Proesmans, Brice Giffard, Ludmilla Martin, Marc Deconchat, Dries Bonte, Jörg Brunet, et al. 2015. “Woodlice and Millipedes in Small Forest Fragments in Europe: Possible Implications for Litter Decomposition.” In Sustaining Ecosystem Services in Forest Landscapes : Book of Abstracts, 44–44. IUFROLE WG Conference.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Smedt, Pallieter, Willem Proesmans, Brice Giffard, Ludmilla Martin, Marc Deconchat, Dries Bonte, Jörg Brunet, Sara Cousins, Martin Diekmann, Martin Hermy, Jaan Liira, Alicia Valdés, Monica Wulf, and Guillaume Decocq. 2015. “Woodlice and Millipedes in Small Forest Fragments in Europe: Possible Implications for Litter Decomposition.” In Sustaining Ecosystem Services in Forest Landscapes : Book of Abstracts, 44–44. IUFROLE WG Conference.
Vancouver
1.
De Smedt P, Proesmans W, Giffard B, Martin L, Deconchat M, Bonte D, et al. Woodlice and millipedes in small forest fragments in Europe: possible implications for litter decomposition. Sustaining ecosystem services in forest landscapes : book of abstracts. IUFROLE WG Conference; 2015. p. 44–44.
IEEE
[1]
P. De Smedt et al., “Woodlice and millipedes in small forest fragments in Europe: possible implications for litter decomposition,” in Sustaining ecosystem services in forest landscapes : book of abstracts, Tartu, Estonia, 2015, pp. 44–44.
@inproceedings{6930039,
  abstract     = {{Arthropods play a crucial role in the decomposition of organic matter. Soil macrofauna, such as wood lice, earth worms and millipedes, represent the first step in the process of litter decomposition on forest floors. They reduce large particles to smaller sizes and are therefore functionally important regarding nutrient cycling. In this study we focus on the distribution of woodlice and millipedes in the forest interior and edges of small forest fragments in agricultural landscapes. Arthropods were sampled using pitfalls in 224 deciduous forest fragments in 7 regions across Europe from south France to central Sweden. Woodlice and millipedes show different patterns and respond in a different way to forest edges. Woodlice were far more abundant in forest edges compared to interiors. This pattern was less clear for millipedes. Also the intensification of the surrounding landscape influences the species composition and numbers, with more individuals in more intensively used landscapes. These relatively immobile species groups show to be strong indicators for the age but less for the size of forest fragments. The differences in species composition and numbers of these important detritivores among forest patches and landscapes is discussed with respect to litter decomposition.}},
  author       = {{De Smedt, Pallieter and Proesmans, Willem and Giffard, Brice and Martin, Ludmilla and Deconchat, Marc and Bonte, Dries and Brunet, Jörg and Cousins, Sara and Diekmann, Martin and Hermy, Martin and Liira, Jaan and Valdés, Alicia and Wulf, Monica and Decocq, Guillaume}},
  booktitle    = {{Sustaining ecosystem services in forest landscapes : book of abstracts}},
  isbn         = {{9789949971503}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Tartu, Estonia}},
  pages        = {{44--44}},
  publisher    = {{IUFROLE WG Conference}},
  title        = {{Woodlice and millipedes in small forest fragments in Europe: possible implications for litter decomposition}},
  year         = {{2015}},
}