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Veal calves produce less antibodies against C. perfringens alpha toxin compared to beef calves

Bonnie Valgaeren (UGent) , Bart Pardon (UGent) , Evy Goossens (UGent) , Stefanie Verherstraeten (UGent) , Sophie Roelandt, Leen Timbermont (UGent) , Nicky Van Der Vekens (UGent) , Sabrina Stuyvaert (UGent) , Linde Gille (UGent) , Laura Van Driessche (UGent) , et al.
(2015) TOXINS. 7(7). p.2586-2597
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Abstract
Enterotoxaemia is a disease with a high associated mortality rate, affecting beef and veal calves worldwide, caused by C. perfringens alpha toxin and perfringolysin. A longitudinal study was conducted to determine the dynamics of antibodies against these toxins in 528 calves on 4 beef and 15 veal farms. The second study aimed to determine the effect of solid feed intake on the production of antibodies against alpha toxin and perfringolysin. The control group only received milk replacer, whereas in the test group solid feed was provided. Maternal antibodies for alpha toxin were present in 45% of the veal calves and 66% of the beef calves. In beef calves a fluent transition from maternal to active immunity was observed for alpha toxin, whereas almost no veal calves developed active immunity. Perfringolysin antibodies significantly declined both in veal and beef calves. In the second study all calves were seropositive for alpha toxin throughout the experiment and solid feed intake did not alter the dynamics of alpha and perfringolysin antibodies. In conclusion, the present study showed that veal calves on a traditional milk replacer diet had significantly lower alpha toxin antibodies compared to beef calves in the risk period for enterotoxaemia, whereas no differences were noticed for perfringolysin.
Keywords
antibodies, alpha toxin, Clostridium perfringens, enterotoxaemia, perfringolysin, veal, NATURALLY ACQUIRED ANTIBODIES, HEMORRHAGIC ENTERITIS, TETANUS ANTITOXIN, ENTEROTOXEMIA, GOATS

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Chicago
Valgaeren, Bonnie, Bart Pardon, Evy Goossens, Stefanie Verherstraeten, Sophie Roelandt, Leen Timbermont, Nicky Van Der Vekens, et al. 2015. “Veal Calves Produce Less Antibodies Against C. Perfringens Alpha Toxin Compared to Beef Calves.” Ed. Michael R Popoff. Toxins 7 (7): 2586–2597.
APA
Valgaeren, B., Pardon, B., Goossens, E., Verherstraeten, S., Roelandt, S., Timbermont, L., Van Der Vekens, N., et al. (2015). Veal calves produce less antibodies against C. perfringens alpha toxin compared to beef calves. (M. R. Popoff, Ed.)TOXINS, 7(7), 2586–2597.
Vancouver
1.
Valgaeren B, Pardon B, Goossens E, Verherstraeten S, Roelandt S, Timbermont L, et al. Veal calves produce less antibodies against C. perfringens alpha toxin compared to beef calves. Popoff MR, editor. TOXINS. 2015;7(7):2586–97.
MLA
Valgaeren, Bonnie, Bart Pardon, Evy Goossens, et al. “Veal Calves Produce Less Antibodies Against C. Perfringens Alpha Toxin Compared to Beef Calves.” Ed. Michael R Popoff. TOXINS 7.7 (2015): 2586–2597. Print.
@article{6929657,
  abstract     = {Enterotoxaemia is a disease with a high associated mortality rate, affecting beef and veal calves worldwide, caused by C. perfringens alpha toxin and perfringolysin. A longitudinal study was conducted to determine the dynamics of antibodies against these toxins in 528 calves on 4 beef and 15 veal farms. The second study aimed to determine the effect of solid feed intake on the production of antibodies against alpha toxin and perfringolysin. The control group only received milk replacer, whereas in the test group solid feed was provided. Maternal antibodies for alpha toxin were present in 45\% of the veal calves and 66\% of the beef calves. In beef calves a fluent transition from maternal to active immunity was observed for alpha toxin, whereas almost no veal calves developed active immunity. Perfringolysin antibodies significantly declined both in veal and beef calves. In the second study all calves were seropositive for alpha toxin throughout the experiment and solid feed intake did not alter the dynamics of alpha and perfringolysin antibodies. In conclusion, the present study showed that veal calves on a traditional milk replacer diet had significantly lower alpha toxin antibodies compared to beef calves in the risk period for enterotoxaemia, whereas no differences were noticed for perfringolysin.},
  author       = {Valgaeren, Bonnie and Pardon, Bart and Goossens, Evy and Verherstraeten, Stefanie and Roelandt, Sophie and Timbermont, Leen and Van Der Vekens, Nicky and Stuyvaert, Sabrina and Gille, Linde and Van Driessche, Laura and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Ducatelle, Richard and Van Immerseel, Filip and Deprez, Piet},
  editor       = {Popoff, Michael R},
  issn         = {2072-6651},
  journal      = {TOXINS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {2586--2597},
  title        = {Veal calves produce less antibodies against C. perfringens alpha toxin compared to beef calves},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/toxins7072586},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2015},
}

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