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Stem respiration and carbon dioxide efflux of young Populus deltoides trees in relation to temperature and xylem carbon dioxide concentration

An Saveyn UGent, Kathy Steppe UGent, Mary Anne McGuire, Raoul Lemeur UGent and Robert O. Teskey (2008) OECOLOGIA. 154(4). p.637-649
abstract
Oxidative respiration is strongly temperature driven. However, in woody stems, efflux of CO2 to the atmosphere (E-A), commonly used to estimate the rate of respiration (R-S), and stem temperature (T-st) have often been poorly correlated, which we hypothesized was due to transport of respired CO2 in xylem sap, especially under high rates of sap flow (f(s)). To test this, we measured E-A, T-st, f(s) and xylem sap CO2 concentrations ([CO2*]) in 3-year-old Populus deltoides trees under different weather conditions (sunny and rainy days) in autumn. We also calculated R-S by mass balance as the sum of both outward and internal CO2 fluxes and hypothesized that R-S would correlate better with T-st than E-A. We found that E-A sometimes correlated well with T-st, but not on sunny mornings and afternoons or on rainy days. When the temperature effect on E-A was accounted for, a clear positive relationship between E-A and xylem [CO2*] was found. [CO2*] varied diurnally and increased substantially at night and during periods of rain. Changes in [CO2*] were related to changes in f(s) but not T-st. We conclude that changes in both respiration and internal CO2 transport altered E-A. The dominant component flux of R-S was E-A. However, on a 24-h basis, the internal transport flux represented 9-18% and 3-7% of R-S on sunny and rainy days, respectively, indicating that the contribution of stem respiration to forest C balance may be larger than previously estimated based on E (A) measurements. Unexpectedly, the relationship between R-S and T-st was sometimes weak in two of the three trees. We conclude that in addition to temperature, other factors such as water deficits or substrate availability exert control on the rate of stem respiration so that simple temperature functions are not sufficient to predict stem respiration.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
journal title
OECOLOGIA
volume
154
issue
4
pages
637 - 649
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000251489000002
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.008 (2008)
JCR rank
33/124 (2008)
JCR quartile
2 (2008)
ISSN
0029-8549
DOI
10.1007/s00442-007-0868-y
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
692499
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-692499
date created
2009-06-12 10:11:12
date last changed
2009-06-12 10:15:30
@article{692499,
  abstract     = {Oxidative respiration is strongly temperature driven. However, in woody stems, efflux of CO2 to the atmosphere (E-A), commonly used to estimate the rate of respiration (R-S), and stem temperature (T-st) have often been poorly correlated, which we hypothesized was due to transport of respired CO2 in xylem sap, especially under high rates of sap flow (f(s)). To test this, we measured E-A, T-st, f(s) and xylem sap CO2 concentrations ([CO2*]) in 3-year-old Populus deltoides trees under different weather conditions (sunny and rainy days) in autumn. We also calculated R-S by mass balance as the sum of both outward and internal CO2 fluxes and hypothesized that R-S would correlate better with T-st than E-A. We found that E-A sometimes correlated well with T-st, but not on sunny mornings and afternoons or on rainy days. When the temperature effect on E-A was accounted for, a clear positive relationship between E-A and xylem [CO2*] was found. [CO2*] varied diurnally and increased substantially at night and during periods of rain. Changes in [CO2*] were related to changes in f(s) but not T-st. We conclude that changes in both respiration and internal CO2 transport altered E-A. The dominant component flux of R-S was E-A. However, on a 24-h basis, the internal transport flux represented 9-18\% and 3-7\% of R-S on sunny and rainy days, respectively, indicating that the contribution of stem respiration to forest C balance may be larger than previously estimated based on E (A) measurements. Unexpectedly, the relationship between R-S and T-st was sometimes weak in two of the three trees. We conclude that in addition to temperature, other factors such as water deficits or substrate availability exert control on the rate of stem respiration so that simple temperature functions are not sufficient to predict stem respiration.},
  author       = {Saveyn, An and Steppe, Kathy and McGuire, Mary Anne and Lemeur, Raoul and Teskey, Robert O.},
  issn         = {0029-8549},
  journal      = {OECOLOGIA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {637--649},
  title        = {Stem respiration and carbon dioxide efflux of young Populus deltoides trees in relation to temperature and xylem carbon dioxide concentration},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-007-0868-y},
  volume       = {154},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Saveyn, An, Kathy Steppe, Mary Anne McGuire, Raoul Lemeur, and Robert O. Teskey. 2008. “Stem Respiration and Carbon Dioxide Efflux of Young Populus Deltoides Trees in Relation to Temperature and Xylem Carbon Dioxide Concentration.” Oecologia 154 (4): 637–649.
APA
Saveyn, A., Steppe, K., McGuire, M. A., Lemeur, R., & Teskey, R. O. (2008). Stem respiration and carbon dioxide efflux of young Populus deltoides trees in relation to temperature and xylem carbon dioxide concentration. OECOLOGIA, 154(4), 637–649.
Vancouver
1.
Saveyn A, Steppe K, McGuire MA, Lemeur R, Teskey RO. Stem respiration and carbon dioxide efflux of young Populus deltoides trees in relation to temperature and xylem carbon dioxide concentration. OECOLOGIA. 2008;154(4):637–49.
MLA
Saveyn, An, Kathy Steppe, Mary Anne McGuire, et al. “Stem Respiration and Carbon Dioxide Efflux of Young Populus Deltoides Trees in Relation to Temperature and Xylem Carbon Dioxide Concentration.” OECOLOGIA 154.4 (2008): 637–649. Print.