Advanced search
1 file | 1.33 MB Add to list

The antipassive in Bantu

(2015) LINGUISTICS. 53(4). p.731-772
Author
Organization
Project
  • KONGOKING (Political centralization, economic integration and language evolution in Central Africa: An interdisciplinary approach to the early history of the Kongo kingdom)
Abstract
The antipassive, an object-demoting diathesis commonly associated with ergative languages, has so far largely gone unnoticed in Bantu languages, which are of the accusative type. In this article, comparative evidence is raised to demonstrate that the antipassive is a voice construction to be reckoned with in Bantu. A robust typology of Bantu voice constructions is developed on the basis of the scarce data available in the literature. This evidence is reinterpreted in the light of original data from a number of Bantu languages, such as Cilubà and Kirundi, which were the subject of a more in-depth analysis. It is shown how the antipassive generally developed as a specific reading of the highly polysemous verbal suffix -an-, which is more commonly used as a reciprocal/associative marker. These and other functions can be accounted for by the underlying notion of “plurality of relations”, which is characterized by a low degree of participant/event elaboration. From a syntactic point of view, it is argued that the development of antipassives out of plurality constructions results from the gradual demotion of the second participant of a co-participative event.
Keywords
associative, sociative, reciprocal, antipassive, derivation, Bantu, voice, habitual, iterative

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.33 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Bostoen, Koen, Sebastian Dom, and Guillaume Segerer. “The Antipassive in Bantu.” LINGUISTICS 53.4 (2015): 731–772. Print.
APA
Bostoen, K., Dom, S., & Segerer, G. (2015). The antipassive in Bantu. LINGUISTICS, 53(4), 731–772.
Chicago author-date
Bostoen, Koen, Sebastian Dom, and Guillaume Segerer. 2015. “The Antipassive in Bantu.” Linguistics 53 (4): 731–772.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Bostoen, Koen, Sebastian Dom, and Guillaume Segerer. 2015. “The Antipassive in Bantu.” Linguistics 53 (4): 731–772.
Vancouver
1.
Bostoen K, Dom S, Segerer G. The antipassive in Bantu. LINGUISTICS. 2015;53(4):731–72.
IEEE
[1]
K. Bostoen, S. Dom, and G. Segerer, “The antipassive in Bantu,” LINGUISTICS, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 731–772, 2015.
@article{6916671,
  abstract     = {The antipassive, an object-demoting diathesis commonly associated with ergative languages, has so far largely gone unnoticed in Bantu languages, which are of the accusative type. In this article, comparative evidence is raised to demonstrate that the antipassive is a voice construction to be reckoned with in Bantu. A robust typology of Bantu voice constructions is developed on the basis of the scarce data available in the literature. This evidence is reinterpreted in the light of original data from a number of Bantu languages, such as Cilubà and Kirundi, which were the subject of a more in-depth analysis. It is shown how the antipassive generally developed as a specific reading of the highly polysemous verbal suffix -an-, which is more commonly used as a reciprocal/associative marker. These and other functions can be accounted for by the underlying notion of “plurality of relations”, which is characterized by a low degree of participant/event elaboration. From a syntactic point of view, it is argued that the development of antipassives out of plurality constructions results from the gradual demotion of the second participant of a co-participative event.},
  author       = {Bostoen, Koen and Dom, Sebastian and Segerer, Guillaume},
  issn         = {0024-3949},
  journal      = {LINGUISTICS},
  keywords     = {associative,sociative,reciprocal,antipassive,derivation,Bantu,voice,habitual,iterative},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {731--772},
  title        = {The antipassive in Bantu},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2015},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: