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Fear appeal in traffic safety advertising: the moderating role of medium context, trait anxiety, and differences between drivers and non-drivers

(2007) PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA. 47(3). p.173-193
Author
Organization
Abstract
The impact was investigated of the intensity of a fear appeal, the valence of the medium context, and the individuals' trait anxiety and personal relevance on the responses of 197 individuals to anti-speeding advertisements. A high level of fear attracts more attention. A negative valence context leads to a more positive anti-speeding attitude. The most important moderating effect of trait anxiety is that the attitude is more positive when low-anxiety individuals are exposed to high fear appeals in a context with negative valence than in a positive context. These results were largely replicated for drivers, but not for nondrivers for whom there was only an attention-getting effect of high fear appeal. Theoretical and practical implications for anti-speeding campaigning are discussed.

Citation

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MLA
Janssens, Wim, and Patrick De Pelsmacker. “Fear Appeal in Traffic Safety Advertising: The Moderating Role of Medium Context, Trait Anxiety, and Differences Between Drivers and Non-drivers.” PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA 47.3 (2007): 173–193. Print.
APA
Janssens, W., & De Pelsmacker, P. (2007). Fear appeal in traffic safety advertising: the moderating role of medium context, trait anxiety, and differences between drivers and non-drivers. PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA, 47(3), 173–193.
Chicago author-date
Janssens, Wim, and Patrick De Pelsmacker. 2007. “Fear Appeal in Traffic Safety Advertising: The Moderating Role of Medium Context, Trait Anxiety, and Differences Between Drivers and Non-drivers.” Psychologica Belgica 47 (3): 173–193.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Janssens, Wim, and Patrick De Pelsmacker. 2007. “Fear Appeal in Traffic Safety Advertising: The Moderating Role of Medium Context, Trait Anxiety, and Differences Between Drivers and Non-drivers.” Psychologica Belgica 47 (3): 173–193.
Vancouver
1.
Janssens W, De Pelsmacker P. Fear appeal in traffic safety advertising: the moderating role of medium context, trait anxiety, and differences between drivers and non-drivers. PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA. 2007;47(3):173–93.
IEEE
[1]
W. Janssens and P. De Pelsmacker, “Fear appeal in traffic safety advertising: the moderating role of medium context, trait anxiety, and differences between drivers and non-drivers,” PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 173–193, 2007.
@article{689768,
  abstract     = {The impact was investigated of the intensity of a fear appeal, the valence of the medium context, and the individuals' trait anxiety and personal relevance on the responses of 197 individuals to anti-speeding advertisements. A high level of fear attracts more attention. A negative valence context leads to a more positive anti-speeding attitude. The most important moderating effect of trait anxiety is that the attitude is more positive when low-anxiety individuals are exposed to high fear appeals in a context with negative valence than in a positive context. These results were largely replicated for drivers, but not for nondrivers for whom there was only an attention-getting effect of high fear appeal. Theoretical and practical implications for anti-speeding campaigning are discussed.},
  author       = {Janssens, Wim and De Pelsmacker, Patrick},
  issn         = {0033-2879},
  journal      = {PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {173--193},
  title        = {Fear appeal in traffic safety advertising: the moderating role of medium context, trait anxiety, and differences between drivers and non-drivers},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2007},
}

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