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Wind tunnel study of ammonia transfer from a manure pit fitted with a dairy cattle slatted floor

Merlijn De Paepe, Jan Pieters UGent, Luciano B Mendes, Stephanie Van Weyenberg, Bart Merci UGent and Peter Demeyer (2016) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY. 37(2). p.202-215
abstract
In dairy cattle systems, most of the feces and urine go to the pit. At the manure pit level, mass transfer of NH3 (kNH(3)) has many factors, but practical difficulties hamper a controlled field evaluation. In this study, we propose a methodology for the determination of an alternative, more practical, pit transfer coefficient of NH3 (PTC), and compare it with kNH(3) determined from other scientific studies. The aims of this research study were: (1) to develop a wind tunnel set-up which mimics air flow patterns between the slats and above a clean section of a slatted floor section, featuring an aqueous NH3-emitting solution; and (2) to assess how air velocity, turbulence intensity, NH3 concentration ([NH3]) and PTC are influenced by inlet airflow ventilation rate (VR) forced deflection of the air above the slats into the manure pit through varying the deflection angle (DA) of a deflection panel and varying pit headspace height (HH). Main conclusions were: (1) the calculated PTC values presented a good fit to the power function of the air speed near the slats (u) (p < .001) while the average PTC (0.0039 m s(-1)) was comparable to kNH(3) values obtained from other studies, by remaining within the range of average values of 0.0015-0.0043 m s(-1); (2) VR and DA significantly impacted [NH3] profiles and PTC (p < .001) and (3) changing slurry pit from 0.10 to 0.90 m HH did not significantly impact [NH3] or PTC (p = .756 and p = .854, respectively).
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ammonia-emitting solution, pit headspace height, barn ventilation rate, flow patterns, automatic solution pH control, NATURALLY VENTILATED DAIRY, HOUSE, TEMPERATURE, MANAGEMENT, MASS-TRANSFER, AIR-FLOW, MECHANISTIC MODELS, EMISSIONS, VOLATILIZATION, SYSTEMS
journal title
ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY
Environ. Technol.
volume
37
issue
2
pages
202 - 215
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000365600000006
JCR category
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.751 (2016)
JCR rank
122/229 (2016)
JCR quartile
3 (2016)
ISSN
0959-3330
DOI
10.1080/09593330.2015.1066449
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6892342
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6892342
date created
2015-08-04 11:33:48
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:15
@article{6892342,
  abstract     = {In dairy cattle systems, most of the feces and urine go to the pit. At the manure pit level, mass transfer of NH3 (kNH(3)) has many factors, but practical difficulties hamper a controlled field evaluation. In this study, we propose a methodology for the determination of an alternative, more practical, pit transfer coefficient of NH3 (PTC), and compare it with kNH(3) determined from other scientific studies. The aims of this research study were: (1) to develop a wind tunnel set-up which mimics air flow patterns between the slats and above a clean section of a slatted floor section, featuring an aqueous NH3-emitting solution; and (2) to assess how air velocity, turbulence intensity, NH3 concentration ([NH3]) and PTC are influenced by inlet airflow ventilation rate (VR) forced deflection of the air above the slats into the manure pit through varying the deflection angle (DA) of a deflection panel and varying pit headspace height (HH). Main conclusions were: (1) the calculated PTC values presented a good fit to the power function of the air speed near the slats (u) (p {\textlangle} .001) while the average PTC (0.0039 m s(-1)) was comparable to kNH(3) values obtained from other studies, by remaining within the range of average values of 0.0015-0.0043 m s(-1); (2) VR and DA significantly impacted [NH3] profiles and PTC (p {\textlangle} .001) and (3) changing slurry pit from 0.10 to 0.90 m HH did not significantly impact [NH3] or PTC (p = .756 and p = .854, respectively).},
  author       = {De Paepe, Merlijn and Pieters, Jan and Mendes, Luciano B and Van Weyenberg, Stephanie and Merci, Bart and Demeyer, Peter},
  issn         = {0959-3330},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {ammonia-emitting solution,pit headspace height,barn ventilation rate,flow patterns,automatic solution pH control,NATURALLY VENTILATED DAIRY,HOUSE,TEMPERATURE,MANAGEMENT,MASS-TRANSFER,AIR-FLOW,MECHANISTIC MODELS,EMISSIONS,VOLATILIZATION,SYSTEMS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {202--215},
  title        = {Wind tunnel study of ammonia transfer from a manure pit fitted with a dairy cattle slatted floor},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2015.1066449},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
De Paepe, Merlijn, Jan Pieters, Luciano B Mendes, Stephanie Van Weyenberg, Bart Merci, and Peter Demeyer. 2016. “Wind Tunnel Study of Ammonia Transfer from a Manure Pit Fitted with a Dairy Cattle Slatted Floor.” Environmental Technology 37 (2): 202–215.
APA
De Paepe, Merlijn, Pieters, J., Mendes, L. B., Van Weyenberg, S., Merci, B., & Demeyer, P. (2016). Wind tunnel study of ammonia transfer from a manure pit fitted with a dairy cattle slatted floor. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY, 37(2), 202–215.
Vancouver
1.
De Paepe M, Pieters J, Mendes LB, Van Weyenberg S, Merci B, Demeyer P. Wind tunnel study of ammonia transfer from a manure pit fitted with a dairy cattle slatted floor. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY. 2016;37(2):202–15.
MLA
De Paepe, Merlijn, Jan Pieters, Luciano B Mendes, et al. “Wind Tunnel Study of Ammonia Transfer from a Manure Pit Fitted with a Dairy Cattle Slatted Floor.” ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 37.2 (2016): 202–215. Print.