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Vocal tract morphology in inhaling singing: an MRI-based study

(2016) JOURNAL OF VOICE. 30(4). p.466-471
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Organization
Abstract
Objectives/Hypothesis. Inhaling singing is a recently developed singing technique explored by the soprano singer Francoise Vanhecke. It is based on an inspiratory airflow instead of an expiratory airflow. This article describes the anatomical structural differences of the vocal tract between inhaling and exhaling singing. We hypothesize that the vocal tract alters significantly in inhaling singing, especially concerning the configuration of the anatomical structures in the oral cavity and the subglottal region. Study Design. This is a prospective study. Methods. A professional singer (F.V.) performed sustained tones from F5 chromatically rising up to Bb5 on the vowel /a/. Vocal tract anatomy is assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results. Wilcoxon directional testing demonstrates (1) that the vocal tract volume above the glottal region does not differ statistically in contrast to the subglottal region and (2) significant changes in the configuration of the tongue, the upright position of the epiglottis, the length of the floor of mouth, and the distance between the teeth. Conclusions. The narrowing of the subglottis is considered to be secondary to suction forces used in the inhaling singing technique. The changes in the anatomical structures above the vocal folds possibly suggest a valve-like function controlling the air inlet together with the regulator function of the resonator capacities of the vocal tract.
Keywords
reverse phonation, resonance, inhaling singing, imaging, ingressive foudation, vocal fold ascillation, IPEMexpressive, RESONANCES, PHONATION, VOICE

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Citation

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Chicago
Moerman, Mieke, Françoise Vanhecke, Lieven Van Assche, Johan Vercruysse, Kristin SDaemers, and Marc Leman. 2016. “Vocal Tract Morphology in Inhaling Singing: An MRI-based Study.” Ed. Robert Thayer Sataloff. Journal of Voice 30 (4): 466–471.
APA
Moerman, Mieke, Vanhecke, F., Van Assche, L., Vercruysse, J., SDaemers, K., & Leman, M. (2016). Vocal tract morphology in inhaling singing: an MRI-based study. (R. T. Sataloff, Ed.)JOURNAL OF VOICE, 30(4), 466–471.
Vancouver
1.
Moerman M, Vanhecke F, Van Assche L, Vercruysse J, SDaemers K, Leman M. Vocal tract morphology in inhaling singing: an MRI-based study. Sataloff RT, editor. JOURNAL OF VOICE. Elsevier; 2016;30(4):466–71.
MLA
Moerman, Mieke, Françoise Vanhecke, Lieven Van Assche, et al. “Vocal Tract Morphology in Inhaling Singing: An MRI-based Study.” Ed. Robert Thayer Sataloff. JOURNAL OF VOICE 30.4 (2016): 466–471. Print.
@article{6890244,
  abstract     = {Objectives/Hypothesis. Inhaling singing is a recently developed singing technique explored by the soprano singer Francoise Vanhecke. It is based on an inspiratory airflow instead of an expiratory airflow. This article describes the anatomical structural differences of the vocal tract between inhaling and exhaling singing. We hypothesize that the vocal tract alters significantly in inhaling singing, especially concerning the configuration of the anatomical structures in the oral cavity and the subglottal region. 

Study Design. This is a prospective study. 

Methods. A professional singer (F.V.) performed sustained tones from F5 chromatically rising up to Bb5 on the vowel /a/. Vocal tract anatomy is assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. 

Results. Wilcoxon directional testing demonstrates (1) that the vocal tract volume above the glottal region does not differ statistically in contrast to the subglottal region and (2) significant changes in the configuration of the tongue, the upright position of the epiglottis, the length of the floor of mouth, and the distance between the teeth. 

Conclusions. The narrowing of the subglottis is considered to be secondary to suction forces used in the inhaling singing technique. The changes in the anatomical structures above the vocal folds possibly suggest a valve-like function controlling the air inlet together with the regulator function of the resonator capacities of the vocal tract.},
  author       = {Moerman, Mieke and Vanhecke, Fran\c{c}oise and Van Assche, Lieven and Vercruysse, Johan and SDaemers, Kristin and Leman, Marc},
  editor       = {Sataloff, Robert Thayer },
  issn         = {0892-1997},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF VOICE},
  keyword      = {reverse phonation,resonance,inhaling singing,imaging,ingressive foudation,vocal fold ascillation,IPEMexpressive,RESONANCES,PHONATION,VOICE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {466--471},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  title        = {Vocal tract morphology in inhaling singing: an MRI-based study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2015.05.001},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2016},
}

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