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The use of pedometers and the '10.000 steps/day'-concept in the promotion of physical activity

(2009)
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(UGent) and (UGent)
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Abstract
Despite the fact that physical activity has been promoted previously, a considerable amount of adults still do not meet the current health-related physical activity guideline of 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. However, an inactive lifestyle is related to inverse health outcomes, consequently, effective physical activity interventions are needed. Recent interventions used step counters or pedometers, mostly in combination with step count goals, to encourage physical activity. In general, the pedometer was found to be an effective intervention tool in the United States, Australia, and Japan. However, no European data on physical activity promotion through pedometer use and step count goals are available. Also information about methodological aspects of pedometer use is missing in Europe. Therefore, the current thesis presents pedometer-related methodological research and pedometer-based intervention studies in Flanders, Belgium (Europe). The first methodological study evaluated the validity of an inexpensive pedometer. Results showed that the „Stepping Meter‟ was unacceptable for research and practice, as it gave invalid information. Two other methodological studies found significant correlations between pedometer-determined step counts and self-reported physical activity, and showed that a valid pedometer is capable of assessing not only walking, but also moderate and vigorous physical activity in different contexts. Pedometer-based interventions were implemented on the micro-, meso-, and macro-level and showed promising results. It was found that a 3-week individual-based intervention consisting of pedometer use, with or without cognitive and behavioural support materials, increased physical activity in motivated individuals. In this study, support materials, such as an information brochure, and a log to set goals and record steps, had an additional positive effect on attitudes towards pedometer use. A workplace pedometer-based intervention was effective in reducing the decrease in step counts, probably caused by winter time, in already active employees. Two effectiveness studies of the community campaign “10,000 Steps Ghent” showed a high project awareness level, a decrease in sitting time, and an increase in physical activity among both active and inactive individuals. An additional study found that pedometer use was more likely in older participants and in those aware of the campaign. Increased step counts were more likely among higher educated individuals, at-risk persons (baseline step counts below 10,000 steps/day) and those who used a pedometer. Furthermore, it was found that pedometer use partly mediated the intervention effect on step counts.

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Citation

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MLA
De Cocker, Katrien. The Use of Pedometers and the ’10.000 Steps/Day’-Concept in the Promotion of Physical Activity. Ghent University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 2009.
APA
De Cocker, K. (2009). The use of pedometers and the ’10.000 steps/day’-concept in the promotion of physical activity. Ghent University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
De Cocker, Katrien. 2009. “The Use of Pedometers and the ’10.000 Steps/Day’-Concept in the Promotion of Physical Activity.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Cocker, Katrien. 2009. “The Use of Pedometers and the ’10.000 Steps/Day’-Concept in the Promotion of Physical Activity.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Vancouver
1.
De Cocker K. The use of pedometers and the ’10.000 steps/day’-concept in the promotion of physical activity. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences; 2009.
IEEE
[1]
K. De Cocker, “The use of pedometers and the ’10.000 steps/day’-concept in the promotion of physical activity,” Ghent University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent, Belgium, 2009.
@phdthesis{686832,
  abstract     = {{Despite the fact that physical activity has been promoted previously, a considerable amount of adults still do not meet the current health-related physical activity guideline of 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. However, an inactive lifestyle is related to inverse health outcomes, consequently, effective physical activity interventions are needed. Recent interventions used step counters or pedometers, mostly in combination with step count goals, to encourage physical activity. In general, the pedometer was found to be an effective intervention tool in the United States, Australia, and Japan. However, no European data on physical activity promotion through pedometer use and step count goals are available. Also information about methodological aspects of pedometer use is missing in Europe. Therefore, the current thesis presents pedometer-related methodological research and pedometer-based intervention studies in Flanders, Belgium (Europe). The first methodological study evaluated the validity of an inexpensive pedometer. Results showed that the „Stepping Meter‟ was unacceptable for research and practice, as it gave invalid information. Two other methodological studies found significant correlations between pedometer-determined step counts and self-reported physical activity, and showed that a valid pedometer is capable of assessing not only walking, but also moderate and vigorous physical activity in different contexts. 
Pedometer-based interventions were implemented on the micro-, meso-, and macro-level and showed promising results. It was found that a 3-week individual-based intervention consisting of pedometer use, with or without cognitive and behavioural support materials, increased physical activity in motivated individuals. In this study, support materials, such as an information brochure, and a log to set goals and record steps, had an additional positive effect on attitudes towards pedometer use. A workplace pedometer-based intervention was effective in reducing the decrease in step counts, probably caused by winter time, in already active employees. Two effectiveness studies of the community campaign “10,000 Steps Ghent” showed a high project awareness level, a decrease in sitting time, and an increase in physical activity among both active and inactive individuals. An additional study found that pedometer use was more likely in older participants and in those aware of the campaign. Increased step counts were more likely among higher educated individuals, at-risk persons (baseline step counts below 10,000 steps/day) and those who used a pedometer. Furthermore, it was found that pedometer use partly mediated the intervention effect on step counts.}},
  author       = {{De Cocker, Katrien}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{IV, 184}},
  publisher    = {{Ghent University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences}},
  school       = {{Ghent University}},
  title        = {{The use of pedometers and the '10.000 steps/day'-concept in the promotion of physical activity}},
  year         = {{2009}},
}