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The association between the parental perception of the physical neighborhood environment and children's location-specific physical activity

Sara D'Haese (UGent) , Delfien Van Dyck (UGent) , Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij (UGent) , Benedicte Deforche (UGent) and Greet Cardon (UGent)
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Abstract
Background: The relationship between children's physical neighborhood environment and their physical activity, has been largely investigated. However in recent reviews, only a few significant and consistent direct associations between children's physical neighborhood environment and their physical activity were found. This is possibly due to the fact that the location where children's physical activity took place, is insufficiently specified. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association between parental perceived neighborhood characteristics and children's physical activity in clearly defined environments. Methods: Children (9-12 years; n = 606) wore an Actigraph accelerometer for 7 days. Parents completed the parental version of the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale questionnaire and reported on children's physical activity in specific locations: physical activity in nearby streets and on sidewalks, physical activity in public recreation spaces and physical activity in the garden. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted in MLwiN 2.30. Results: Children were more likely to be active in nearby streets and on sidewalks, if their parents perceived lower street connectivity (OR = 0.479; 95 % CI = 0.33 and 0.70), higher land use mix accessibility (OR = 1.704; 95 % CI = 1.25 and 2.33) and more crime safety (OR = 1.879; 95 % CI = 1.29 and 2.74). Children whose parents perceived higher presence of recreation facilities (OR = 1.618; CI = 1.23; 2.12) were more likely to be active in public recreation spaces. No environmental neighborhood variables were related to physical activity in the garden and overall moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity. Conclusions: The parental perceived physical neighborhood environment relates differently to physical activity in different locations. In order to develop effective interventions, it seems promising to further investigate the association between location-specific physical activity and specific neighborhood environmental correlates.
Keywords
Activity, Children, Location, NEWS, Neighborhood, SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS, BELGIAN CHILDREN, FREE-PLAY, YOUTH, SCHOOL, ADOLESCENTS, WALKABILITY, OVERWEIGHT, CHILDHOOD, TRANSPORT

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
D’Haese, Sara et al. “The Association Between the Parental Perception of the Physical Neighborhood Environment and Children’s Location-specific Physical Activity.” BMC PUBLIC HEALTH 15 (2015): n. pag. Print.
APA
D’Haese, S., Van Dyck, D., De Bourdeaudhuij, I., Deforche, B., & Cardon, G. (2015). The association between the parental perception of the physical neighborhood environment and children’s location-specific physical activity. BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 15.
Chicago author-date
D’Haese, Sara, Delfien Van Dyck, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Benedicte Deforche, and Greet Cardon. 2015. “The Association Between the Parental Perception of the Physical Neighborhood Environment and Children’s Location-specific Physical Activity.” Bmc Public Health 15.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
D’Haese, Sara, Delfien Van Dyck, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Benedicte Deforche, and Greet Cardon. 2015. “The Association Between the Parental Perception of the Physical Neighborhood Environment and Children’s Location-specific Physical Activity.” Bmc Public Health 15.
Vancouver
1.
D’Haese S, Van Dyck D, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Deforche B, Cardon G. The association between the parental perception of the physical neighborhood environment and children’s location-specific physical activity. BMC PUBLIC HEALTH. 2015;15.
IEEE
[1]
S. D’Haese, D. Van Dyck, I. De Bourdeaudhuij, B. Deforche, and G. Cardon, “The association between the parental perception of the physical neighborhood environment and children’s location-specific physical activity,” BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, vol. 15, 2015.
@article{6867084,
  abstract     = {Background: The relationship between children's physical neighborhood environment and their physical activity, has been largely investigated. However in recent reviews, only a few significant and consistent direct associations between children's physical neighborhood environment and their physical activity were found. This is possibly due to the fact that the location where children's physical activity took place, is insufficiently specified. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association between parental perceived neighborhood characteristics and children's physical activity in clearly defined environments. 
Methods: Children (9-12 years; n = 606) wore an Actigraph accelerometer for 7 days. Parents completed the parental version of the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale questionnaire and reported on children's physical activity in specific locations: physical activity in nearby streets and on sidewalks, physical activity in public recreation spaces and physical activity in the garden. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted in MLwiN 2.30. 
Results: Children were more likely to be active in nearby streets and on sidewalks, if their parents perceived lower street connectivity (OR = 0.479; 95 % CI = 0.33 and 0.70), higher land use mix accessibility (OR = 1.704; 95 % CI = 1.25 and 2.33) and more crime safety (OR = 1.879; 95 % CI = 1.29 and 2.74). Children whose parents perceived higher presence of recreation facilities (OR = 1.618; CI = 1.23; 2.12) were more likely to be active in public recreation spaces. No environmental neighborhood variables were related to physical activity in the garden and overall moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity. 
Conclusions: The parental perceived physical neighborhood environment relates differently to physical activity in different locations. In order to develop effective interventions, it seems promising to further investigate the association between location-specific physical activity and specific neighborhood environmental correlates.},
  articleno    = {565},
  author       = {D'Haese, Sara and Van Dyck, Delfien and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and Deforche, Benedicte and Cardon, Greet},
  issn         = {1471-2458},
  journal      = {BMC PUBLIC HEALTH},
  keywords     = {Activity,Children,Location,NEWS,Neighborhood,SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS,BELGIAN CHILDREN,FREE-PLAY,YOUTH,SCHOOL,ADOLESCENTS,WALKABILITY,OVERWEIGHT,CHILDHOOD,TRANSPORT},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {9},
  title        = {The association between the parental perception of the physical neighborhood environment and children's location-specific physical activity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1937-5},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2015},
}

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