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The interaction between felt touch and tactile consequences of observed actions: an action-based somatosensory congruency paradigm

Eliane Deschrijver (UGent) , Roeljan Wiersema (UGent) and Marcel Brass (UGent)
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Abstract
Action observation leads to a representation of both the motor aspect of an observed action (motor simulation) and its somatosensory consequences (action-based somatosensory simulation) in the observer's brain. In the current electroencephalography-study, we investigated the neuronal interplay of action-based somatosensory simulation and felt touch. We presented index or middle finger tapping movements of a human or a wooden hand, while simultaneously presenting 'tap-like' tactile sensations to either the corresponding or non-corresponding fingertip of the participant. We focused on an early stage of somatosensory processing [P50, N100 and N140 sensory evoked potentials (SEPs)] and on a later stage of higher-order processing (P3-complex). The results revealed an interaction effect of animacy and congruency in the early P50 SEP and an animacy effect in the N100/N140 SEPs. In the P3-complex, we found an interaction effect indicating that the influence of congruency was larger in the human than in the wooden hand. We argue that the P3-complex may reflect higher-order self-other distinction by signaling simulated action-based touch that does not match own tactile information. As such, the action-based somatosensory congruency paradigm might help understand higher-order social processes from a somatosensory point of view.
Keywords
somatosensory simulation, P3, TIME-COURSE, RIGHT TEMPOROPARIETAL JUNCTION, CORTEX, ERP, HAND, BODY, MOTOR, FMRI, ENHANCEMENT, MODULATION, motor simulation, mirror neurons, sensory evoked potential (SEP), self-other distinction

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Chicago
Deschrijver, Eliane, Roeljan Wiersema, and Marcel Brass. 2016. “The Interaction Between Felt Touch and Tactile Consequences of Observed Actions: An Action-based Somatosensory Congruency Paradigm.” Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 11 (7): 1162–1172.
APA
Deschrijver, E., Wiersema, R., & Brass, M. (2016). The interaction between felt touch and tactile consequences of observed actions: an action-based somatosensory congruency paradigm. SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE, 11(7), 1162–1172.
Vancouver
1.
Deschrijver E, Wiersema R, Brass M. The interaction between felt touch and tactile consequences of observed actions: an action-based somatosensory congruency paradigm. SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 2016;11(7):1162–72.
MLA
Deschrijver, Eliane, Roeljan Wiersema, and Marcel Brass. “The Interaction Between Felt Touch and Tactile Consequences of Observed Actions: An Action-based Somatosensory Congruency Paradigm.” SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE 11.7 (2016): 1162–1172. Print.
@article{6861702,
  abstract     = {Action observation leads to a representation of both the motor aspect of an observed action (motor simulation) and its somatosensory consequences (action-based somatosensory simulation) in the observer's brain. In the current electroencephalography-study, we investigated the neuronal interplay of action-based somatosensory simulation and felt touch. We presented index or middle finger tapping movements of a human or a wooden hand, while simultaneously presenting 'tap-like' tactile sensations to either the corresponding or non-corresponding fingertip of the participant. We focused on an early stage of somatosensory processing [P50, N100 and N140 sensory evoked potentials (SEPs)] and on a later stage of higher-order processing (P3-complex). The results revealed an interaction effect of animacy and congruency in the early P50 SEP and an animacy effect in the N100/N140 SEPs. In the P3-complex, we found an interaction effect indicating that the influence of congruency was larger in the human than in the wooden hand. We argue that the P3-complex may reflect higher-order self-other distinction by signaling simulated action-based touch that does not match own tactile information. As such, the action-based somatosensory congruency paradigm might help understand higher-order social processes from a somatosensory point of view.},
  author       = {Deschrijver, Eliane and Wiersema, Roeljan and Brass, Marcel},
  issn         = {1749-5016},
  journal      = {SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1162--1172},
  title        = {The interaction between felt touch and tactile consequences of observed actions: an action-based somatosensory congruency paradigm},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsv081},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2016},
}

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