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Persistent aggregates in apheresis platelet concentrates

(2015) VOX SANGUINIS. 108(4). p.368-377
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Abstract
BACKGROUND: Aggregates often appear during apheresis. Sometimes, these persist throughout storage, causing product wastage. This study assessed product quality of apheresis concentrates containing persistent aggregates (PA) and aimed to identify the factors that contribute to their formation. METHODS: Donation (n = 180) and platelet indices (n ≥ 10) from apheresis concentrates with PA were compared with aggregate-free products. RESULTS: The proportion of donors with at least one previous PA donation was twofold higher in the PA group (P < 0·0001) indicating a donor dependence. Significantly higher donor whole blood platelet counts (286 ± 50 vs. 266 ± 49 × 10(3) /μl, P < 0·0001) and higher apheresis yields (6·0 ± 1·6 vs. 5·4 ± 1·5 × 10(11) , P < 0·0001) were noted in the PA group. Haematocrit was also slightly higher, but age, gender and body mass were similar. The pH of PA products on day six postdonation was significantly lower (P < 0·001), in line with higher lactic acid concentrations. Flow cytometry showed no differences in GPIbα levels or phosphatidylserine exposure. However, there was slightly more integrin activation as well as increased degranulation measured by P-selectin expression. Cytokine concentrations were also significantly higher in PA concentrates. Aggregation was normal in response to SFLLRN peptide and collagen stimulation, but agglutination at low-dose ristocetin was significantly higher (P = 0.01) in PA products. Finally, PA were disintegrated by plasmin-mediated thrombolysis but not by integrin αIIb β3 inhibition. CONCLUSION: Products with PA have acceptable quality parameters, but additional functional studies are warranted. Furthermore, PA are more likely to recur in certain donors who have higher platelet counts.
Keywords
QUALITY, AGITATION, ACTIVATION, apheresis, blood collection, platelet concentrates, VON-WILLEBRAND-FACTOR, SHEAR-STRESS, HEALTHY-INDIVIDUALS, SYSTEMS, PLASMA, PROTEIN, RISK

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Chicago
Feys, Hendrik, José Coene, Rosalie Devloo, Britt Van Aelst, H Pottel, Philippe Vandekerckhove, and Veerle Compernolle. 2015. “Persistent Aggregates in Apheresis Platelet Concentrates.” Vox Sanguinis 108 (4): 368–377.
APA
Feys, H., Coene, J., Devloo, R., Van Aelst, B., Pottel, H., Vandekerckhove, P., & Compernolle, V. (2015). Persistent aggregates in apheresis platelet concentrates. VOX SANGUINIS, 108(4), 368–377.
Vancouver
1.
Feys H, Coene J, Devloo R, Van Aelst B, Pottel H, Vandekerckhove P, et al. Persistent aggregates in apheresis platelet concentrates. VOX SANGUINIS. 2015;108(4):368–77.
MLA
Feys, Hendrik et al. “Persistent Aggregates in Apheresis Platelet Concentrates.” VOX SANGUINIS 108.4 (2015): 368–377. Print.
@article{6860724,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Aggregates often appear during apheresis. Sometimes, these persist throughout storage, causing product wastage. This study assessed product quality of apheresis concentrates containing persistent aggregates (PA) and aimed to identify the factors that contribute to their formation.
METHODS: Donation (n = 180) and platelet indices (n \ensuremath{\geq} 10) from apheresis concentrates with PA were compared with aggregate-free products.
RESULTS: The proportion of donors with at least one previous PA donation was twofold higher in the PA group (P {\textlangle} 0{\textperiodcentered}0001) indicating a donor dependence. Significantly higher donor whole blood platelet counts (286 {\textpm} 50 vs. 266 {\textpm} 49 {\texttimes} 10(3) /\ensuremath{\mu}l, P {\textlangle} 0{\textperiodcentered}0001) and higher apheresis yields (6{\textperiodcentered}0 {\textpm} 1{\textperiodcentered}6 vs. 5{\textperiodcentered}4 {\textpm} 1{\textperiodcentered}5 {\texttimes} 10(11) , P {\textlangle} 0{\textperiodcentered}0001) were noted in the PA group. Haematocrit was also slightly higher, but age, gender and body mass were similar. The pH of PA products on day six postdonation was significantly lower (P {\textlangle} 0{\textperiodcentered}001), in line with higher lactic acid concentrations. Flow cytometry showed no differences in GPIb\ensuremath{\alpha} levels or phosphatidylserine exposure. However, there was slightly more integrin activation as well as increased degranulation measured by P-selectin expression. Cytokine concentrations were also significantly higher in PA concentrates. Aggregation was normal in response to SFLLRN peptide and collagen stimulation, but agglutination at low-dose ristocetin was significantly higher (P = 0.01) in PA products. Finally, PA were disintegrated by plasmin-mediated thrombolysis but not by integrin \ensuremath{\alpha}IIb \ensuremath{\beta}3 inhibition.
CONCLUSION: Products with PA have acceptable quality parameters, but additional functional studies are warranted. Furthermore, PA are more likely to recur in certain donors who have higher platelet counts.},
  author       = {Feys, Hendrik and Coene, Jos{\'e} and Devloo, Rosalie and Van Aelst, Britt and  Pottel, H and Vandekerckhove, Philippe and Compernolle, Veerle},
  issn         = {0042-9007},
  journal      = {VOX SANGUINIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {368--377},
  title        = {Persistent aggregates in apheresis platelet concentrates},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vox.12243},
  volume       = {108},
  year         = {2015},
}

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