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Why we should not select the faster embryo: lessons from mice and cattle

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Abstract
Many studies have shown that in vitro culture can negatively impact preimplantation development. This necessitates some selection criteria for identifying the best-suited embryos for transfer. That said, embryo selection after in vitro culture remains a subjective process in most mammalian species, including cows, mice and humans. General consensus in the field is that embryos that develop in a timely manner have the highest developmental competence and viability after transfer. Herein lies the key question: what is a timely manner? With emerging data in bovine and mouse supporting increased developmental competency in embryos with moderate rates of development, it is time to question whether the fastest developing embryos are the best embryos for transfer in the human clinic. This is especially relevant to epigenetic gene regulation, including genomic imprinting, where faster developing embryos exhibit loss of imprinted methylation, as well as to sex selection bias, where faster developmental rates of male embryos may lead to biased embryo transfer and, in turn, biased sex ratios. In this review, we explore evidence surrounding the question of developmental timing as it relates to bovine embryo quality, mouse embryo quality and genomic imprint maintenance, and embryo sex.
Keywords
embryo culture, developmental kinetics, embryo quality, epigenetics, sex, IN-VITRO FERTILIZATION, TRANSCRIPTIONAL SEXUAL-DIMORPHISM, MOUSE PREIMPLANTATION EMBRYOS, CLEAVAGE POST-INSEMINATION, MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION, BOVINE 2-CELL EMBRYOS, X-LINKED GENE, DEVELOPMENTAL COMPETENCE, 1ST CLEAVAGE, BLASTOCYST STAGE

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MLA
Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso et al. “Why We Should Not Select the Faster Embryo: Lessons from Mice and Cattle.” REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT 27.5 (2015): 765–775. Print.
APA
Gutierrez-Adan, A., White, C. R., Van Soom, A., & Mann, M. R. (2015). Why we should not select the faster embryo: lessons from mice and cattle. REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 27(5), 765–775.
Chicago author-date
Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso, Carlee R White, Ann Van Soom, and Mellissa RW Mann. 2015. “Why We Should Not Select the Faster Embryo: Lessons from Mice and Cattle.” Reproduction Fertility and Development 27 (5): 765–775.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso, Carlee R White, Ann Van Soom, and Mellissa RW Mann. 2015. “Why We Should Not Select the Faster Embryo: Lessons from Mice and Cattle.” Reproduction Fertility and Development 27 (5): 765–775.
Vancouver
1.
Gutierrez-Adan A, White CR, Van Soom A, Mann MR. Why we should not select the faster embryo: lessons from mice and cattle. REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT. 2015;27(5):765–75.
IEEE
[1]
A. Gutierrez-Adan, C. R. White, A. Van Soom, and M. R. Mann, “Why we should not select the faster embryo: lessons from mice and cattle,” REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, vol. 27, no. 5, pp. 765–775, 2015.
@article{6855330,
  abstract     = {Many studies have shown that in vitro culture can negatively impact preimplantation development. This necessitates some selection criteria for identifying the best-suited embryos for transfer. That said, embryo selection after in vitro culture remains a subjective process in most mammalian species, including cows, mice and humans. General consensus in the field is that embryos that develop in a timely manner have the highest developmental competence and viability after transfer. Herein lies the key question: what is a timely manner? With emerging data in bovine and mouse supporting increased developmental competency in embryos with moderate rates of development, it is time to question whether the fastest developing embryos are the best embryos for transfer in the human clinic. This is especially relevant to epigenetic gene regulation, including genomic imprinting, where faster developing embryos exhibit loss of imprinted methylation, as well as to sex selection bias, where faster developmental rates of male embryos may lead to biased embryo transfer and, in turn, biased sex ratios. In this review, we explore evidence surrounding the question of developmental timing as it relates to bovine embryo quality, mouse embryo quality and genomic imprint maintenance, and embryo sex.},
  author       = {Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso and White, Carlee R and Van Soom, Ann and Mann, Mellissa RW},
  issn         = {1031-3613},
  journal      = {REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT},
  keywords     = {embryo culture,developmental kinetics,embryo quality,epigenetics,sex,IN-VITRO FERTILIZATION,TRANSCRIPTIONAL SEXUAL-DIMORPHISM,MOUSE PREIMPLANTATION EMBRYOS,CLEAVAGE POST-INSEMINATION,MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION,BOVINE 2-CELL EMBRYOS,X-LINKED GENE,DEVELOPMENTAL COMPETENCE,1ST CLEAVAGE,BLASTOCYST STAGE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {765--775},
  title        = {Why we should not select the faster embryo: lessons from mice and cattle},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/RD14216},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2015},
}

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