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Atypical forms of employment in the aviation sector', European social dialogue, European Commission, 2015

Yves Jorens (UGent) , Dirk Gillis (UGent) , Lien Valcke (UGent) , Joyce De Coninck (UGent) , Anneline Devolder (UGent) and Marlies De Coninck (UGent)
(2015)
Author
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Atypical Forms of Employment in the Aviation Sector’, European Social Dialogue, European Commission, 2015.
Abstract
The liberalisation of the European aviation market and the emergence of new business models– e.g. low-cost airlines – has given rise to numerous trends in contemporary employment relations concluded vis-à-vis pilots and cabin crew members. On the one hand this evolution significantly increased and facilitated the competitive nature of the aviation industry to the benefit of individual consumers in what concerns not only price, but equally so, accessibility. On the other hand however, atypical forms of employment (atypical for this study is every form of employment other than an open-ended employment contract) are increasingly prevalent within the aviation industry as a result thereof, including, amongst others, self-employment, fixed-term work, work via temporary work agencies as well as zero-hour contracts and pay-to-fly schemes. Whilst from a legal perspective, atypical forms of employment may not necessarily be problematic, there is rising concern that the application and usage thereof may be subject to potential abuse, to the detriment of the pilots and cabin crew members concerned. Indeed, cost-efficient techniques such as the use of atypical employment are a result of heightened competition and the prevalence of new business models that emerged in the liberalised competitive aviation market. Unfortunately some of these techniques have proven detrimental to both fair competition and workers' rights.
Keywords
aviation, atypical employment

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Jorens, Yves et al. “Atypical Forms of Employment in the Aviation Sector’, European Social Dialogue, European Commission, 2015.” 2015 : n. pag. Print.
APA
Jorens, Y., Gillis, D., Valcke, L., De Coninck, J., Devolder, A., & De Coninck, M. (2015). Atypical forms of employment in the aviation sector’, European social dialogue, European Commission, 2015. Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Jorens, Yves, Dirk Gillis, Lien Valcke, Joyce De Coninck, Anneline Devolder, and Marlies De Coninck. 2015. “Atypical Forms of Employment in the Aviation Sector’, European Social Dialogue, European Commission, 2015”. Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Jorens, Yves, Dirk Gillis, Lien Valcke, Joyce De Coninck, Anneline Devolder, and Marlies De Coninck. 2015. “Atypical Forms of Employment in the Aviation Sector’, European Social Dialogue, European Commission, 2015”. Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Jorens Y, Gillis D, Valcke L, De Coninck J, Devolder A, De Coninck M. Atypical forms of employment in the aviation sector’, European social dialogue, European Commission, 2015. Ghent, Belgium; 2015.
IEEE
[1]
Y. Jorens, D. Gillis, L. Valcke, J. De Coninck, A. Devolder, and M. De Coninck, “Atypical forms of employment in the aviation sector’, European social dialogue, European Commission, 2015.” Ghent, Belgium, 2015.
@misc{6852830,
  abstract     = {The liberalisation of the European aviation market and the emergence of new business models– e.g. low-cost airlines – has given rise to numerous trends in contemporary employment relations concluded vis-à-vis pilots and cabin crew members. On the one hand this evolution significantly increased and facilitated the competitive nature of the aviation industry to the benefit of individual consumers in what concerns not only price, but equally so, accessibility. On the other hand however, atypical forms of employment (atypical for this study is every form of employment other than an open-ended employment contract) are increasingly prevalent within the aviation industry as a result thereof, including, amongst others, self-employment, fixed-term work, work via temporary work agencies as well as zero-hour contracts and pay-to-fly schemes. Whilst from a legal perspective, atypical forms of employment may not necessarily be problematic, there is rising concern that the application and usage thereof may be subject to potential abuse, to the detriment of the pilots and cabin crew members concerned. Indeed, cost-efficient techniques such as the use of atypical employment are a result of heightened competition and the prevalence of new business models that emerged in the liberalised competitive aviation market. Unfortunately some of these techniques have proven detrimental to both fair competition and workers' rights.},
  author       = {Jorens, Yves and Gillis, Dirk and Valcke, Lien and De Coninck, Joyce and Devolder, Anneline and De Coninck, Marlies},
  keywords     = {aviation,atypical employment},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {310},
  title        = {Atypical forms of employment in the aviation sector', European social dialogue, European Commission, 2015},
  year         = {2015},
}