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Serum and urinary cystatin C in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and cats with hyperthyroidism

Liesbeth Ghys, Dominique Paepe UGent, Elien Taffin, Eva Vandermeulen UGent, Luc Duchateau UGent, Pascale Smets UGent, Joris Delanghe UGent and Sylvie Daminet UGent (2016) JOURNAL OF FELINE MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 18(8). p.658-665
abstract
Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate serum cystatin C (sCysC) and urinary cystatin C (uCysC) in cats with hyperthyroidism and cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Methods: Thirty cats with FIV, 26 hyperthyroid cats and 28 healthy cats were included. sCysC and uCysC:creatinine (uCysC/uCr) ratio were measured with a human particle-enhanced nephelometric immunoassay, previously validated for feline CysC measurement. Routine renal variables (serum creatinine [sCr], urine specific gravity, urinary protein:creatinine ratio [UPC]) were also measured in the three groups. Results: Cats with hyperthyroidism had significantly higher sCysC and higher uCysC/uCr ratio, lower sCr and a higher UPC than healthy cats. Cats with FIV infection did not show a significantly higher sCysC concentration but had a significantly higher sCr and UPC than healthy cats. uCysC could be detected in only four of them. Conclusions and relevance: This study demonstrated that sCysC is increased in cats with hyperthyroidism, in contrast with sCr, but not in cats with FIV. Many hyperthyroid cats, but only four cats with FIV, had an elevated uCysC/uCr ratio. Further studies may reveal if uCysC might be a valuable marker for tubular dysfunction in cats.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE, CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE, RENAL-FUNCTION, THYROID-DYSFUNCTION, REFERENCE INTERVAL, CREATININE, MARKER, THYROXINE, DOGS, HYPOTHYROIDISM
journal title
JOURNAL OF FELINE MEDICINE AND SURGERY
J. Feline Med. Surg.
volume
18
issue
8
pages
658 - 665
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000380989800011
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.131 (2016)
JCR rank
53/136 (2016)
JCR quartile
2 (2016)
ISSN
1098-612X
DOI
10.1177/1098612X15592343
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6842737
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6842737
date created
2015-06-23 09:43:17
date last changed
2016-12-22 14:29:58
@article{6842737,
  abstract     = {Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate serum cystatin C (sCysC) and urinary cystatin C (uCysC) in cats with hyperthyroidism and cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). 
Methods: Thirty cats with FIV, 26 hyperthyroid cats and 28 healthy cats were included. sCysC and uCysC:creatinine (uCysC/uCr) ratio were measured with a human particle-enhanced nephelometric immunoassay, previously validated for feline CysC measurement. Routine renal variables (serum creatinine [sCr], urine specific gravity, urinary protein:creatinine ratio [UPC]) were also measured in the three groups. 
Results: Cats with hyperthyroidism had significantly higher sCysC and higher uCysC/uCr ratio, lower sCr and a higher UPC than healthy cats. Cats with FIV infection did not show a significantly higher sCysC concentration but had a significantly higher sCr and UPC than healthy cats. uCysC could be detected in only four of them. 
Conclusions and relevance: This study demonstrated that sCysC is increased in cats with hyperthyroidism, in contrast with sCr, but not in cats with FIV. Many hyperthyroid cats, but only four cats with FIV, had an elevated uCysC/uCr ratio. Further studies may reveal if uCysC might be a valuable marker for tubular dysfunction in cats.},
  author       = {Ghys, Liesbeth and Paepe, Dominique and Taffin, Elien and Vandermeulen, Eva and Duchateau, Luc and Smets, Pascale and Delanghe, Joris and Daminet, Sylvie},
  issn         = {1098-612X},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF FELINE MEDICINE AND SURGERY},
  keyword      = {GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE,CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE,RENAL-FUNCTION,THYROID-DYSFUNCTION,REFERENCE INTERVAL,CREATININE,MARKER,THYROXINE,DOGS,HYPOTHYROIDISM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {658--665},
  title        = {Serum and urinary cystatin C in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and cats with hyperthyroidism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098612X15592343},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Ghys, Liesbeth, Dominique Paepe, Elien Taffin, Eva Vandermeulen, Luc Duchateau, Pascale Smets, Joris Delanghe, and Sylvie Daminet. 2016. “Serum and Urinary Cystatin C in Cats with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Cats with Hyperthyroidism.” Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 18 (8): 658–665.
APA
Ghys, L., Paepe, D., Taffin, E., Vandermeulen, E., Duchateau, L., Smets, P., Delanghe, J., et al. (2016). Serum and urinary cystatin C in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and cats with hyperthyroidism. JOURNAL OF FELINE MEDICINE AND SURGERY, 18(8), 658–665.
Vancouver
1.
Ghys L, Paepe D, Taffin E, Vandermeulen E, Duchateau L, Smets P, et al. Serum and urinary cystatin C in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and cats with hyperthyroidism. JOURNAL OF FELINE MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 2016;18(8):658–65.
MLA
Ghys, Liesbeth, Dominique Paepe, Elien Taffin, et al. “Serum and Urinary Cystatin C in Cats with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Cats with Hyperthyroidism.” JOURNAL OF FELINE MEDICINE AND SURGERY 18.8 (2016): 658–665. Print.