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New human-specific brain landmark: the depth asymmetry of superior temporal sulcus

Francois Leroy, Qing Cai, Stephanie L Bogart, Jessica Dubois, Olivier Coulon, Karla Monzalvo, Clara Fischer, Hervé Glasel, Lise Van der Haegen UGent, Audrey Bénézit, et al. (2015) PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 112(4). p.1208-1213
abstract
Identifying potentially unique features of the human cerebral cortex is a first step to understanding how evolution has shaped the brain in our species. By analyzing MR images obtained from 177 humans and 73 chimpanzees, we observed a human-specific asymmetry in the superior temporal sulcus at the heart of the communication regions and which we have named the “superior temporal asymmetrical pit” (STAP). This 45-mm-long segment ven- tral to Heschl’s gyrus is deeper in the right hemisphere than in the left in 95% of typical human subjects, from infanthood till adult- hood, and is present, irrespective of handedness, language later- alization, and sex although it is greater in males than in females. The STAP also is seen in several groups of atypical subjects includ- ing persons with situs inversus, autistic spectrum disorder, Turner syndrome, and corpus callosum agenesis. It is explained in part by the larger number of sulcal interruptions in the left than in the right hemisphere. Its early presence in the infants of this study as well as in fetuses and premature infants suggests a strong genetic influence. Because this asymmetry is barely visible in chimpanzees, we recommend the STAP region during midgestation as an impor- tant phenotype to investigate asymmetrical variations of gene expression among the primate lineage. This genetic target may provide important insights regarding the evolution of the crucial cognitive abilities sustained by this sulcus in our species, namely communication and social cognition.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
LEFT-HANDERS, STRUCTURAL ASYMMETRIES, AREA, HANDEDNESS, INFANTS, FMRI, brain, anatomy, asymmetry, human-specific, STS, LANGUAGE LATERALIZATION, PLANUM TEMPORALE, HUMAN CEREBRAL-CORTEX, SURFACE-BASED ANALYSIS
journal title
PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
volume
112
issue
4
pages
1208 - 1213
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000348417000064
JCR category
MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
9.423 (2015)
JCR rank
4/63 (2015)
JCR quartile
1 (2015)
ISSN
0027-8424
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1412389112
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
6842484
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-6842484
date created
2015-06-23 09:23:12
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:40:04
@article{6842484,
  abstract     = {Identifying potentially unique features of the human cerebral
cortex is a first step to understanding how evolution has shaped
the brain in our species. By analyzing MR images obtained from
177 humans and 73 chimpanzees, we observed a human-specific
asymmetry in the superior temporal sulcus at the heart of the
communication regions and which we have named the {\textquotedblleft}superior
temporal asymmetrical pit{\textquotedblright} (STAP). This 45-mm-long segment ven-
tral to Heschl{\textquoteright}s gyrus is deeper in the right hemisphere than in the
left in 95\% of typical human subjects, from infanthood till adult-
hood, and is present, irrespective of handedness, language later-
alization, and sex although it is greater in males than in females.
The STAP also is seen in several groups of atypical subjects includ-
ing persons with situs inversus, autistic spectrum disorder, Turner
syndrome, and corpus callosum agenesis. It is explained in part by
the larger number of sulcal interruptions in the left than in the
right hemisphere. Its early presence in the infants of this study as
well as in fetuses and premature infants suggests a strong genetic
influence. Because this asymmetry is barely visible in chimpanzees,
we recommend the STAP region during midgestation as an impor-
tant phenotype to investigate asymmetrical variations of gene
expression among the primate lineage. This genetic target may
provide important insights regarding the evolution of the crucial
cognitive abilities sustained by this sulcus in our species, namely
communication and social cognition.},
  author       = {Leroy, Francois and Cai, Qing and Bogart, Stephanie L and Dubois, Jessica and Coulon, Olivier and Monzalvo, Karla and Fischer, Clara and Glasel, Herv{\'e} and Van der Haegen, Lise and B{\'e}n{\'e}zit, Audrey and Lin, Ching-Po and Kennedy, David N and Ihara, Aya S and Hertz-Pannier, Lucie and Moutard, Marie-Laure and Poupon, Cyril and Brysbaert, Marc and Roberts, Neil and Hopkins, William D and Mangin, Jean-Francois and Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine},
  issn         = {0027-8424},
  journal      = {PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA},
  keyword      = {LEFT-HANDERS,STRUCTURAL ASYMMETRIES,AREA,HANDEDNESS,INFANTS,FMRI,brain,anatomy,asymmetry,human-specific,STS,LANGUAGE LATERALIZATION,PLANUM TEMPORALE,HUMAN CEREBRAL-CORTEX,SURFACE-BASED ANALYSIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1208--1213},
  title        = {New human-specific brain landmark: the depth asymmetry of superior temporal sulcus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1412389112},
  volume       = {112},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Leroy, Francois, Qing Cai, Stephanie L Bogart, Jessica Dubois, Olivier Coulon, Karla Monzalvo, Clara Fischer, et al. 2015. “New Human-specific Brain Landmark: The Depth Asymmetry of Superior Temporal Sulcus.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112 (4): 1208–1213.
APA
Leroy, Francois, Cai, Q., Bogart, S. L., Dubois, J., Coulon, O., Monzalvo, K., Fischer, C., et al. (2015). New human-specific brain landmark: the depth asymmetry of superior temporal sulcus. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 112(4), 1208–1213.
Vancouver
1.
Leroy F, Cai Q, Bogart SL, Dubois J, Coulon O, Monzalvo K, et al. New human-specific brain landmark: the depth asymmetry of superior temporal sulcus. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 2015;112(4):1208–13.
MLA
Leroy, Francois, Qing Cai, Stephanie L Bogart, et al. “New Human-specific Brain Landmark: The Depth Asymmetry of Superior Temporal Sulcus.” PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 112.4 (2015): 1208–1213. Print.