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Avoiding transitional effects in dynamic circuit specialisation on FPGAs

Karel Heyse (UGent) and Dirk Stroobandt (UGent)
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Abstract
Dynamic Circuit Specialisation (DCS) is a technique that uses the reconfigurability of an FPGA to optimise a circuit during run-time, thus achieving higher performance and lower resource cost. However, run-time reconfiguration causes transitional effects that form an important problem for DCS. Because of these, the DCS circuit cannot be used while it is being reconfigured. This limits the usability of DCS for streaming applications and other applications that cannot tolerate downtime. For other applications, this results in a loss of performance. In this paper, we present a technique to perform partial reconfiguration for DCS without transitional effects, thus allowing the circuit to remain fully functional at all times. The proposed method performs DCS by reconfiguring only LookUp Tables of the FPGA and does not require changes to the configuration architecture of the FPGA. The approach was tested and evaluated on current Xilinx FPGAs.
Keywords
transitional effects, FPGA, partial reconfiguration, dynamic circuit specialisation

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Heyse, Karel, and Dirk Stroobandt. “Avoiding Transitional Effects in Dynamic Circuit Specialisation on FPGAs.” Design Automation Conference DAC. New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2015. Print.
APA
Heyse, K., & Stroobandt, D. (2015). Avoiding transitional effects in dynamic circuit specialisation on FPGAs. Design Automation Conference DAC. Presented at the 52nd ACM/EDAC/IEEE Design Automation Conference (DAC), New York, NY, USA: ACM.
Chicago author-date
Heyse, Karel, and Dirk Stroobandt. 2015. “Avoiding Transitional Effects in Dynamic Circuit Specialisation on FPGAs.” In Design Automation Conference DAC. New York, NY, USA: ACM.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Heyse, Karel, and Dirk Stroobandt. 2015. “Avoiding Transitional Effects in Dynamic Circuit Specialisation on FPGAs.” In Design Automation Conference DAC. New York, NY, USA: ACM.
Vancouver
1.
Heyse K, Stroobandt D. Avoiding transitional effects in dynamic circuit specialisation on FPGAs. Design Automation Conference DAC. New York, NY, USA: ACM; 2015.
IEEE
[1]
K. Heyse and D. Stroobandt, “Avoiding transitional effects in dynamic circuit specialisation on FPGAs,” in Design Automation Conference DAC, San Francisco, CA, USA, 2015.
@inproceedings{6838698,
  abstract     = {Dynamic Circuit Specialisation (DCS) is a technique that uses the reconfigurability of an FPGA to optimise a circuit during run-time, thus achieving higher performance and lower resource cost. However, run-time reconfiguration causes transitional effects that form an important problem for DCS. Because of these, the DCS circuit cannot be used while it is being reconfigured. This limits the usability of DCS for streaming applications and other applications that cannot tolerate downtime. For other applications, this results in a loss of performance. In this paper, we present a technique to perform partial reconfiguration for DCS without transitional effects, thus allowing the circuit to remain fully functional at all times. The proposed method performs DCS by reconfiguring only LookUp Tables of the FPGA and does not require changes to the configuration architecture of the FPGA. The approach was tested and evaluated on current Xilinx FPGAs.},
  articleno    = {159},
  author       = {Heyse, Karel and Stroobandt, Dirk},
  booktitle    = {Design Automation Conference DAC},
  isbn         = {9781450335201},
  issn         = {0738-100X},
  keywords     = {transitional effects,FPGA,partial reconfiguration,dynamic circuit specialisation},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {San Francisco, CA, USA},
  pages        = {6},
  publisher    = {ACM},
  title        = {Avoiding transitional effects in dynamic circuit specialisation on FPGAs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2744769.2744802},
  year         = {2015},
}

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