Advanced search
1 file | 193.49 KB Add to list

Atypical neural responses to vocal anger in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Author
Organization
Abstract
BackgroundDeficits in facial emotion processing, reported in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), have been linked to both early perceptual and later attentional components of event-related potentials (ERPs). However, the neural underpinnings of vocal emotion processing deficits in ADHD have yet to be characterised. Here, we report the first ERP study of vocal affective prosody processing in ADHD. MethodsEvent-related potentials of 6-11-year-old children with ADHD (n=25) and typically developing controls (n=25) were recorded as they completed a task measuring recognition of vocal prosodic stimuli (angry, happy and neutral). Audiometric assessments were conducted to screen for hearing impairments. ResultsChildren with ADHD were less accurate than controls at recognising vocal anger. Relative to controls, they displayed enhanced N100 and attenuated P300 components to vocal anger. The P300 effect was reduced, but remained significant, after controlling for N100 effects by rebaselining. Only the N100 effect was significant when children with ADHD and comorbid conduct disorder (n=10) were excluded. ConclusionThis study provides the first evidence linking ADHD to atypical neural activity during the early perceptual stages of vocal anger processing. These effects may reflect preattentive hyper-vigilance to vocal anger in ADHD.
Keywords
EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS, EMOTIONAL INFORMATION, DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, MISMATCH NEGATIVITY, SOCIAL COGNITION, AUDITORY-CORTEX, CHILDREN, PROSODY, ERP, Attention-deficit, hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, emotion processing, vocal, event-related potential, prosody

Downloads

  • Chronaki Benikos2015 JCPP.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 193.49 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Chronaki, G et al. “Atypical Neural Responses to Vocal Anger in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder.” JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY 56.4 (2015): 477–487. Print.
APA
Chronaki, G, Benikos, N., Fairchild, G., & Barke, E. (2015). Atypical neural responses to vocal anger in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY, 56(4), 477–487.
Chicago author-date
Chronaki, G, N Benikos, G Fairchild, and Edmund Barke. 2015. “Atypical Neural Responses to Vocal Anger in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 56 (4): 477–487.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Chronaki, G, N Benikos, G Fairchild, and Edmund Barke. 2015. “Atypical Neural Responses to Vocal Anger in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 56 (4): 477–487.
Vancouver
1.
Chronaki G, Benikos N, Fairchild G, Barke E. Atypical neural responses to vocal anger in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY. 2015;56(4):477–87.
IEEE
[1]
G. Chronaki, N. Benikos, G. Fairchild, and E. Barke, “Atypical neural responses to vocal anger in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder,” JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 477–487, 2015.
@article{6837416,
  abstract     = {BackgroundDeficits in facial emotion processing, reported in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), have been linked to both early perceptual and later attentional components of event-related potentials (ERPs). However, the neural underpinnings of vocal emotion processing deficits in ADHD have yet to be characterised. Here, we report the first ERP study of vocal affective prosody processing in ADHD.
 
MethodsEvent-related potentials of 6-11-year-old children with ADHD (n=25) and typically developing controls (n=25) were recorded as they completed a task measuring recognition of vocal prosodic stimuli (angry, happy and neutral). Audiometric assessments were conducted to screen for hearing impairments.
 
ResultsChildren with ADHD were less accurate than controls at recognising vocal anger. Relative to controls, they displayed enhanced N100 and attenuated P300 components to vocal anger. The P300 effect was reduced, but remained significant, after controlling for N100 effects by rebaselining. Only the N100 effect was significant when children with ADHD and comorbid conduct disorder (n=10) were excluded.
 
ConclusionThis study provides the first evidence linking ADHD to atypical neural activity during the early perceptual stages of vocal anger processing. These effects may reflect preattentive hyper-vigilance to vocal anger in ADHD.},
  author       = {Chronaki, G and Benikos, N and Fairchild, G and Barke, Edmund},
  issn         = {0021-9630},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY},
  keywords     = {EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS,EMOTIONAL INFORMATION,DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER,SELECTIVE ATTENTION,MISMATCH NEGATIVITY,SOCIAL COGNITION,AUDITORY-CORTEX,CHILDREN,PROSODY,ERP,Attention-deficit,hyperactivity disorder,conduct disorder,emotion processing,vocal,event-related potential,prosody},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {477--487},
  title        = {Atypical neural responses to vocal anger in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12312},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2015},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: