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Nest predation in Afrotropical forest fragments shaped by inverse edge effects, timing of nest initiation and vegetation structure

(2014) JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY. 155(2). p.411-420
Author
Organization
Abstract
High levels of nest predation influence the population dynamics of many tropical birds, especially when deforestation alters nest predator communities. The consequences of tropical forest fragmentation on nest predation, however, remain poorly understood, as natural predation patterns have only been well documented in a handful of tropical forests. Here, we show the results of an extensive study of predation on natural nests of Cabanis's Greenbul (Phyllastrephus cabanisi) during 3 years in a highly fragmented cloud forest in SE Kenya. Overall predation rates derived from 228 scrub nests averaged 69 %, matching the typical high predation level on tropical bird species. However, predation rates strongly varied in space and time, and a model that combined timing effects of fragment, edge, concealment, year and nest was best supported by our data. Nest predation rates consistently increased from forest edge to interior, opposing the classic edge effect on nest predation, and supporting the idea that classic edge effects are much rarer in Afrotropical forests than elsewhere. Nest concealment also affected predation rates, but the strength and direction of the relationship varied across breeding seasons and fragments. Apart from spatial variation, predation rates declined during the breeding season, although the strength of this pattern varied among breeding seasons. Complex and variable relationships with nest predation, such as those demonstrated here, suggest that several underlying mechanisms interact and imply that fixed nesting strategies may have variable-even opposing-fitness effects between years, sites and habitats.
Keywords
LIFE-HISTORY EVOLUTION, Nest success, Tropical birds, Habitat fragmentation, Taita Hills, Phyllastrephus cabanisi placidus, TROPICAL FOREST, HABITAT FRAGMENTATION, ARTIFICIAL NESTS, SITE SELECTION, SUCCESS, LANDSCAPE, BIRDS, SURVIVAL, CONCEALMENT

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Citation

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MLA
Spanhove, Toon et al. “Nest Predation in Afrotropical Forest Fragments Shaped by Inverse Edge Effects, Timing of Nest Initiation and Vegetation Structure.” JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY 155.2 (2014): 411–420. Print.
APA
Spanhove, T., Callens, T., Hallmann, C. A., Pellikka, P., & Lens, L. (2014). Nest predation in Afrotropical forest fragments shaped by inverse edge effects, timing of nest initiation and vegetation structure. JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY, 155(2), 411–420.
Chicago author-date
Spanhove, Toon, Tom Callens, Caspar A Hallmann, Petri Pellikka, and Luc Lens. 2014. “Nest Predation in Afrotropical Forest Fragments Shaped by Inverse Edge Effects, Timing of Nest Initiation and Vegetation Structure.” Journal of Ornithology 155 (2): 411–420.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Spanhove, Toon, Tom Callens, Caspar A Hallmann, Petri Pellikka, and Luc Lens. 2014. “Nest Predation in Afrotropical Forest Fragments Shaped by Inverse Edge Effects, Timing of Nest Initiation and Vegetation Structure.” Journal of Ornithology 155 (2): 411–420.
Vancouver
1.
Spanhove T, Callens T, Hallmann CA, Pellikka P, Lens L. Nest predation in Afrotropical forest fragments shaped by inverse edge effects, timing of nest initiation and vegetation structure. JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY. 2014;155(2):411–20.
IEEE
[1]
T. Spanhove, T. Callens, C. A. Hallmann, P. Pellikka, and L. Lens, “Nest predation in Afrotropical forest fragments shaped by inverse edge effects, timing of nest initiation and vegetation structure,” JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY, vol. 155, no. 2, pp. 411–420, 2014.
@article{6834636,
  abstract     = {High levels of nest predation influence the population dynamics of many tropical birds, especially when deforestation alters nest predator communities. The consequences of tropical forest fragmentation on nest predation, however, remain poorly understood, as natural predation patterns have only been well documented in a handful of tropical forests. Here, we show the results of an extensive study of predation on natural nests of Cabanis's Greenbul (Phyllastrephus cabanisi) during 3 years in a highly fragmented cloud forest in SE Kenya. Overall predation rates derived from 228 scrub nests averaged 69 %, matching the typical high predation level on tropical bird species. However, predation rates strongly varied in space and time, and a model that combined timing effects of fragment, edge, concealment, year and nest was best supported by our data. Nest predation rates consistently increased from forest edge to interior, opposing the classic edge effect on nest predation, and supporting the idea that classic edge effects are much rarer in Afrotropical forests than elsewhere. Nest concealment also affected predation rates, but the strength and direction of the relationship varied across breeding seasons and fragments. Apart from spatial variation, predation rates declined during the breeding season, although the strength of this pattern varied among breeding seasons. Complex and variable relationships with nest predation, such as those demonstrated here, suggest that several underlying mechanisms interact and imply that fixed nesting strategies may have variable-even opposing-fitness effects between years, sites and habitats.},
  author       = {Spanhove, Toon and Callens, Tom and Hallmann, Caspar A and Pellikka, Petri and Lens, Luc},
  issn         = {0021-8375},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {LIFE-HISTORY EVOLUTION,Nest success,Tropical birds,Habitat fragmentation,Taita Hills,Phyllastrephus cabanisi placidus,TROPICAL FOREST,HABITAT FRAGMENTATION,ARTIFICIAL NESTS,SITE SELECTION,SUCCESS,LANDSCAPE,BIRDS,SURVIVAL,CONCEALMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {411--420},
  title        = {Nest predation in Afrotropical forest fragments shaped by inverse edge effects, timing of nest initiation and vegetation structure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-013-1021-9},
  volume       = {155},
  year         = {2014},
}

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