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Networks for reversible logic

Alexis De Vos UGent and Yvan Van Rentergem (2008) Boolean Problems, 8th International workshop, Proceedings. p.41-47
abstract
If we like to make an arbitrary permutation of a large number (say n) objects, where n is a non-prime number (n = pq, with both p and q integer), it is advantageous to arrange the objects in a rectangular p×q matrix. Then the permutation can be performed in three steps: first one applies a permutation where all objects remain in the same row, then one applies a permutation where all objects remain in the same column, and finally one applies a second permutation where all objects remain in the same row. In telecommunication, this remarkable theorem is the basis of so-called Clos networks, where w communication wires have to be permuted, according to one of the w! possible permutations. In binary digital communication, w wires transport one of the 2w possible messages. Reversible computing consists of applying a permutation, not to the w wires but to the 2w possible messages. The Clos approach allows us to build reversible binary computers very efficiently. The approach is somewhat less efficient for multiple-valued reversible logic and, unfortunately, is not applicable at all for arbitrary quantum circuits.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
reversibele logica
in
Boolean Problems, 8th International workshop, Proceedings
editor
B Steinbach
pages
41 - 47
publisher
Freiberg University of Mining and Technology
place of publication
Freiberg, Germany
conference name
8th International workshop on Boolean Problems
conference location
Freiberg, Germany
conference start
2008-09-18
conference end
2008-09-19
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
id
678838
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-678838
date created
2009-06-05 01:07:16
date last changed
2010-09-24 14:11:23
@inproceedings{678838,
  abstract     = {If we like to make an arbitrary permutation of a large number (say n) objects, where n is a non-prime number (n = pq, with both p and q integer), it is advantageous to arrange the objects in a rectangular p{\texttimes}q matrix. Then the permutation can be performed in three steps: first one applies a permutation where all objects remain in the same row, then one applies a permutation where all objects remain in the same column, and finally one applies a second permutation where all objects remain in the same row. In telecommunication, this remarkable theorem is the basis of so-called Clos networks, where w communication wires have to be permuted, according to one of the w! possible permutations. In binary digital communication, w wires transport one of the 2w possible messages. Reversible computing consists of applying a permutation, not to the w wires but to the 2w possible messages. The Clos approach allows us to build reversible binary computers very efficiently. The approach is somewhat less efficient for multiple-valued reversible logic and, unfortunately, is not applicable at all for arbitrary quantum circuits.},
  author       = {De Vos, Alexis and Van Rentergem, Yvan},
  booktitle    = {Boolean Problems, 8th International workshop, Proceedings},
  editor       = {Steinbach, B},
  keyword      = {reversibele logica},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Freiberg, Germany},
  pages        = {41--47},
  publisher    = {Freiberg University of Mining and Technology},
  title        = {Networks for reversible logic},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
De Vos, Alexis, and Yvan Van Rentergem. 2008. “Networks for Reversible Logic.” In Boolean Problems, 8th International Workshop, Proceedings, ed. B Steinbach, 41–47. Freiberg, Germany: Freiberg University of Mining and Technology.
APA
De Vos, Alexis, & Van Rentergem, Y. (2008). Networks for reversible logic. In B Steinbach (Ed.), Boolean Problems, 8th International workshop, Proceedings (pp. 41–47). Presented at the 8th International workshop on Boolean Problems, Freiberg, Germany: Freiberg University of Mining and Technology.
Vancouver
1.
De Vos A, Van Rentergem Y. Networks for reversible logic. In: Steinbach B, editor. Boolean Problems, 8th International workshop, Proceedings. Freiberg, Germany: Freiberg University of Mining and Technology; 2008. p. 41–7.
MLA
De Vos, Alexis, and Yvan Van Rentergem. “Networks for Reversible Logic.” Boolean Problems, 8th International Workshop, Proceedings. Ed. B Steinbach. Freiberg, Germany: Freiberg University of Mining and Technology, 2008. 41–47. Print.