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An array waveguide sensor for artificial optical skins

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Abstract
We present a concept for an artificial optical skin, a flexible foil in which a novel type of optical force sensing elements is integrated. The principle relies on the change in coupling between two arrays of crossing polymer waveguides separated by a thin layer of soft silicone. When the exerted pressure is increasing, the distance between the waveguides decreases and consequently power is transmitted from one to another. A process flow to produce a proof of principle demonstrator with arrays of Truemode (TM) waveguides embedded in silicone is described. In a second approach also the waveguides are fabricated in silicone using an embossing technique.
Keywords
polymer waveguides, silicone waveguides, embossing, artificial optical skin, array waveguide sensor

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Chicago
Missinne, Jeroen, Geert Van Steenberge, Bram Van Hoe, Kristof Van Coillie, Tim Van Gijseghem, Peter Dubruel, Jan Vanfleteren, and Peter Van Daele. 2009. “An Array Waveguide Sensor for Artificial Optical Skins.” In Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, ed. AL Glebov and RT Chen. Vol. 7221. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
APA
Missinne, J., Van Steenberge, G., Van Hoe, B., Van Coillie, K., Van Gijseghem, T., Dubruel, P., Vanfleteren, J., et al. (2009). An array waveguide sensor for artificial optical skins. In A. Glebov & R. Chen (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 7221). Presented at the Conference on Photonics Packaging, Integration, and Interconnects IX, Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
Vancouver
1.
Missinne J, Van Steenberge G, Van Hoe B, Van Coillie K, Van Gijseghem T, Dubruel P, et al. An array waveguide sensor for artificial optical skins. In: Glebov A, Chen R, editors. Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering; 2009.
MLA
Missinne, Jeroen, Geert Van Steenberge, Bram Van Hoe, et al. “An Array Waveguide Sensor for Artificial Optical Skins.” Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering. Ed. AL Glebov & RT Chen. Vol. 7221. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, 2009. Print.
@inproceedings{676503,
  abstract     = {We present a concept for an artificial optical skin, a flexible foil in which a novel type of optical force sensing elements is integrated. The principle relies on the change in coupling between two arrays of crossing polymer waveguides separated by a thin layer of soft silicone. When the exerted pressure is increasing, the distance between the waveguides decreases and consequently power is transmitted from one to another. A process flow to produce a proof of principle demonstrator with arrays of Truemode (TM) waveguides embedded in silicone is described. In a second approach also the waveguides are fabricated in silicone using an embossing technique.},
  articleno    = {722105},
  author       = {Missinne, Jeroen and Van Steenberge, Geert and Van Hoe, Bram and Van Coillie, Kristof and Van Gijseghem, Tim and Dubruel, Peter and Vanfleteren, Jan and Van Daele, Peter},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering},
  editor       = {Glebov, AL and Chen, RT},
  isbn         = {9780819474674},
  issn         = {0277-786X},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {San Jos{\'e}, CA, USA},
  pages        = {9},
  publisher    = {SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering},
  title        = {An array waveguide sensor for artificial optical skins},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.809154},
  volume       = {7221},
  year         = {2009},
}

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