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Effect of temperature on transport of chloride ions in concrete

Qiang Yuan UGent, Caijun Shi, Geert De Schutter UGent and Katrien Audenaert UGent (2008) Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting II. p.345-351
abstract
Chloride-induced corrosion is the major durability issue of reinforced concrete structures along seacoast and in cold areas where de-icing salts are used. Various service life prediction models based on chloride induced corrosion have been developed. Temperature plays an important role in modeling chloride transport in cement-based materials. However, it is often overlooked. In this paper, the effect of temperature on non-steady-state migration and diffusion coefficients of chloride ion in concrete with water-to-cement ratios of 0.35, 0.48 and 0.6 were investigated. Non-steady-state migration coefficient was measured at 20°C adn 5°C following NT build 492. Non-steady-state diffusion coefficient was measured at 5°C, 20°C and 40°C according to NT build 443. The effect of temperature on migration/diffusion coefficient is examined by using Arrhenius Equation. The results show that higher temperatures result in higher diffusion/migration coefficients. Temperatures alter the chloride penetration depth, but not the trend of chloride profile. The activation energy obtained from non-steady-state migration coefficient is quite comparable to Samson and Marchand’s results (Cement and Concrete Research, V37, 2007, 455-468), which is around 20 kJ/mol, and independent of water-to-cement ratio. However, the activation energy obtained from non-steady-state diffusion tests ranges from 17.9 to 39.9 kJ/mol, which seems dependent on water-to-cement ratio. The surface chloride concentration is also affected by water-to-cement ratio and temperature.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting II
editor
Mark G. Alexander, Hans-Dieter Beushausen, Frank Dehn and Pilate Moyo
pages
345 - 351
publisher
CRC Press/Balkema
place of publication
Leiden, The Netherlands
conference name
2nd International Conference on Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting (ICCRRR)
conference location
Cape Town, South Africa
conference start
2008-11-24
conference end
2008-11-26
ISBN
978-0-415-46850-3
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
675012
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-675012
date created
2009-06-02 14:52:24
date last changed
2009-07-02 11:31:29
@inproceedings{675012,
  abstract     = {Chloride-induced corrosion is the major durability issue of reinforced concrete structures along seacoast and in cold areas where de-icing salts are used. Various service life prediction models based on chloride induced corrosion have been developed. Temperature plays an important role in modeling chloride transport in cement-based materials. However, it is often overlooked. In this paper, the effect of temperature on non-steady-state migration and diffusion coefficients of chloride ion in concrete with water-to-cement ratios of 0.35, 0.48 and 0.6 were investigated. Non-steady-state migration coefficient was measured at 20{\textdegree}C adn 5{\textdegree}C following NT build 492. Non-steady-state diffusion coefficient was measured at 5{\textdegree}C, 20{\textdegree}C and 40{\textdegree}C according to NT build 443. The effect of temperature on migration/diffusion coefficient is examined by using Arrhenius Equation. The results show that higher temperatures result in higher diffusion/migration coefficients. Temperatures alter the chloride penetration depth, but not the trend of chloride profile. The activation energy obtained from non-steady-state migration coefficient is quite comparable to Samson and Marchand{\textquoteright}s results (Cement and Concrete Research, V37, 2007, 455-468), which is around 20 kJ/mol, and independent of water-to-cement ratio. However, the activation energy obtained from non-steady-state diffusion tests ranges from 17.9 to 39.9 kJ/mol, which seems dependent on water-to-cement ratio. The surface chloride concentration is also affected by water-to-cement ratio and temperature.},
  author       = {Yuan, Qiang and Shi, Caijun and De Schutter, Geert and Audenaert, Katrien},
  booktitle    = {Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting II},
  editor       = {Alexander, Mark G. and Beushausen, Hans-Dieter and Dehn, Frank and Moyo, Pilate},
  isbn         = {978-0-415-46850-3},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Cape Town, South Africa},
  pages        = {345--351},
  publisher    = {CRC Press/Balkema},
  title        = {Effect of temperature on transport of chloride ions in concrete},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Yuan, Qiang, Caijun Shi, Geert De Schutter, and Katrien Audenaert. 2008. “Effect of Temperature on Transport of Chloride Ions in Concrete.” In Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting II, ed. Mark G. Alexander, Hans-Dieter Beushausen, Frank Dehn, and Pilate Moyo, 345–351. Leiden, The Netherlands: CRC Press/Balkema.
APA
Yuan, Q., Shi, C., De Schutter, G., & Audenaert, K. (2008). Effect of temperature on transport of chloride ions in concrete. In M. G. Alexander, H.-D. Beushausen, F. Dehn, & P. Moyo (Eds.), Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting II (pp. 345–351). Presented at the 2nd International Conference on Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting (ICCRRR), Leiden, The Netherlands: CRC Press/Balkema.
Vancouver
1.
Yuan Q, Shi C, De Schutter G, Audenaert K. Effect of temperature on transport of chloride ions in concrete. In: Alexander MG, Beushausen H-D, Dehn F, Moyo P, editors. Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting II. Leiden, The Netherlands: CRC Press/Balkema; 2008. p. 345–51.
MLA
Yuan, Qiang, Caijun Shi, Geert De Schutter, et al. “Effect of Temperature on Transport of Chloride Ions in Concrete.” Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting II. Ed. Mark G. Alexander et al. Leiden, The Netherlands: CRC Press/Balkema, 2008. 345–351. Print.