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Perching behaviour and perch height preference of laying hens in furnished cages varying in height

Ester Struelens, Frank Tuyttens UGent, Luc Duchateau UGent, Timothy Leroy, Michael Cox, Erik Vranken, Johan Buyse, Johan Zoons, Daniel Berckmans and Frank Odberg UGent, et al. (2008) BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE. 49(4). p.381-389
abstract
1. The objective was to investigate the effect of cage height on perch height preference and perching behaviour in laying hens. Twelve groups of two hens and 12 groups of 14 hens were tested in furnished cages equipped with two wooden perches. These stepwise perches were designed such that hens could choose between 7 different heights (6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31 and 36 cm). Day- and night-time perching behaviour was observed on 4 consecutive days with a different cage height each day: 150, 55, 50 and 45 cm. 2. Given that a minimum perch-roof distance of 19 to 24 cm was available, hens preferred to roost on the highest perches at night. 3. Lowering cage height not only forced hens to use lower perches, but also reduced time spent on the perches during the day (two-hen and 14-hen test) and night (14-hen test). Moreover, it affected daytime behavioural activities (more standing and less preening) on the perches in the two-hen tests (but not in the 14-hen tests). 4. During the day lower perches were used more for standing and walking, higher perches more for sitting and sleeping. This behavioural differentiation was most pronounced in the highest cages. 5. Perch preference and perching behaviour depend on both the floor-perch distance and the perch-roof distance. Higher cages provide more opportunity for higher perches (which hens prefer), for better three-dimensional spacing (and consequently reduced density at floor level) and for behavioural differentiation according to perch height.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
STRENGTH, DOMESTIC-FOWL, ACCESS, AREA
journal title
BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE
Br. Poult. Sci.
volume
49
issue
4
pages
381 - 389
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000258450400001
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
1.134 (2008)
JCR rank
18/45 (2008)
JCR quartile
2 (2008)
ISSN
0007-1668
DOI
10.1080/00071660802158332
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
672475
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-672475
date created
2009-05-29 16:22:55
date last changed
2014-02-19 11:09:36
@article{672475,
  abstract     = {1. The objective was to investigate the effect of cage height on perch height preference and perching behaviour in laying hens. Twelve groups of two hens and 12 groups of 14 hens were tested in furnished cages equipped with two wooden perches. These stepwise perches were designed such that hens could choose between 7 different heights (6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31 and 36 cm). Day- and night-time perching behaviour was observed on 4 consecutive days with a different cage height each day: 150, 55, 50 and 45 cm.
2. Given that a minimum perch-roof distance of 19 to 24 cm was available, hens preferred to roost on the highest perches at night.
3. Lowering cage height not only forced hens to use lower perches, but also reduced time spent on the perches during the day (two-hen and 14-hen test) and night (14-hen test). Moreover, it affected daytime behavioural activities (more standing and less preening) on the perches in the two-hen tests (but not in the 14-hen tests).
4. During the day lower perches were used more for standing and walking, higher perches more for sitting and sleeping. This behavioural differentiation was most pronounced in the highest cages.
5. Perch preference and perching behaviour depend on both the floor-perch distance and the perch-roof distance. Higher cages provide more opportunity for higher perches (which hens prefer), for better three-dimensional spacing (and consequently reduced density at floor level) and for behavioural differentiation according to perch height.},
  author       = {Struelens, Ester and Tuyttens, Frank and Duchateau, Luc and Leroy, Timothy and Cox, Michael and Vranken, Erik and Buyse, Johan and Zoons, Johan and Berckmans, Daniel and Odberg, Frank and Sonck, Bart},
  issn         = {0007-1668},
  journal      = {BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {STRENGTH,DOMESTIC-FOWL,ACCESS,AREA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {381--389},
  title        = {Perching behaviour and perch height preference of laying hens in furnished cages varying in height},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00071660802158332},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Struelens, Ester, Frank Tuyttens, Luc Duchateau, Timothy Leroy, Michael Cox, Erik Vranken, Johan Buyse, et al. 2008. “Perching Behaviour and Perch Height Preference of Laying Hens in Furnished Cages Varying in Height.” British Poultry Science 49 (4): 381–389.
APA
Struelens, E., Tuyttens, F., Duchateau, L., Leroy, T., Cox, M., Vranken, E., Buyse, J., et al. (2008). Perching behaviour and perch height preference of laying hens in furnished cages varying in height. BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE, 49(4), 381–389.
Vancouver
1.
Struelens E, Tuyttens F, Duchateau L, Leroy T, Cox M, Vranken E, et al. Perching behaviour and perch height preference of laying hens in furnished cages varying in height. BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE. 2008;49(4):381–9.
MLA
Struelens, Ester, Frank Tuyttens, Luc Duchateau, et al. “Perching Behaviour and Perch Height Preference of Laying Hens in Furnished Cages Varying in Height.” BRITISH POULTRY SCIENCE 49.4 (2008): 381–389. Print.