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Dorsoproximal proximal phalanx osteochondral fragmentation in 117 Warmblood horses

Jeroen Declercq UGent, Ann Martens UGent, Dominiek Maes UGent, B Boussauw, Ramses Forsyth UGent and KJ Boening (2009) VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY. 22(1). p.1-6
abstract
The objective of the present study was to determine clinical and arthroscopic characteristics associated with dorsoproximal proximal phalanx (PI) fragments in Warmblood horses, as well as to examine their histopathological appearance. One hundred sixty-eight fragments were removed from 150 fetlocks of 117 Warmblood horses. Details of signalment and results of clinical examination were collected prior to surgery. After arthroscopic fragment removal and joint evaluation for synovial and/or cartilage abnormalities, the fragments were measured and evaluated histopathologically. The vast majority of the fragments (95.2%) were found medially, without predilection for front or hind limbs. In 10% of the joints, mate than one fragment was present. The mean size of the fragments was 6.8 +/- 2.6 mm. Only eight horses presented fetlock-related lameness. Horses of,even years of age and older (OR = 13.32; p = 0.033) and the presence of mote than one fragment (OR = 11.12;p = 0.016) were significantly associated with lameness. Arthroscopic evaluation revealed one or more abnormalities in 50.7% of the joints. On histopathology, osteochondral fragments presented as a bony center covered with smooth hyaline cartilage on one side and some fibrous tissue on the other side. No clear histopothological signs were indicating precisely their origin, In Warmblood horses with dorsoproximal P1 fragments, the age (seven years and older) and the presence of more than one fragment in a fetlock significantly increased the risk of lamer ess. The osteochondral dorsopioximal P1 fragments could be defined as a developmental orthopaedic disease.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
fetlock, Warmblood horse, osteochondral fragment, proximal phalanx, histopathology, STANDARD-BRED TROTTERS, RACING PERFORMANCE, METACARPOPHALANGEAL, METATARSOPHALANGEAL, FRACTURES, JOINTS, RACEHORSES, PREVALENCE
journal title
VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY
Vet. Comp. Orthop. Traumatol.
volume
22
issue
1
pages
1 - 6
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000263462600003
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
0.931 (2009)
JCR rank
59/141 (2009)
JCR quartile
2 (2009)
ISSN
0932-0814
DOI
10.3415/VCOT-08-02-0016
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
672112
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-672112
date created
2009-05-29 14:22:11
date last changed
2009-06-23 15:51:43
@article{672112,
  abstract     = {The objective of the present study was to determine clinical and arthroscopic characteristics associated with dorsoproximal proximal phalanx (PI) fragments in Warmblood horses, as well as to examine their histopathological appearance. One hundred sixty-eight fragments were removed from 150 fetlocks of 117 Warmblood horses. Details of signalment and results of clinical examination were collected prior to surgery. After arthroscopic fragment removal and joint evaluation for synovial and/or cartilage abnormalities, the fragments were measured and evaluated histopathologically. The vast majority of the fragments (95.2\%) were found medially, without predilection for front or hind limbs. In 10\% of the joints, mate than one fragment was present. The mean size of the fragments was 6.8 +/- 2.6 mm. Only eight horses presented fetlock-related lameness. Horses of,even years of age and older (OR = 13.32; p = 0.033) and the presence of mote than one fragment (OR = 11.12;p = 0.016) were significantly associated with lameness. Arthroscopic evaluation revealed one or more abnormalities in 50.7\% of the joints. On histopathology, osteochondral fragments presented as a bony center covered with smooth hyaline cartilage on one side and some fibrous tissue on the other side. No clear histopothological signs were indicating precisely their origin, In Warmblood horses with dorsoproximal P1 fragments, the age (seven years and older) and the presence of more than one fragment in a fetlock significantly increased the risk of lamer ess. The osteochondral dorsopioximal P1 fragments could be defined as a developmental orthopaedic disease.},
  author       = {Declercq, Jeroen and Martens, Ann and Maes, Dominiek and Boussauw, B and Forsyth, Ramses and Boening, KJ},
  issn         = {0932-0814},
  journal      = {VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY},
  keyword      = {fetlock,Warmblood horse,osteochondral fragment,proximal phalanx,histopathology,STANDARD-BRED TROTTERS,RACING PERFORMANCE,METACARPOPHALANGEAL,METATARSOPHALANGEAL,FRACTURES,JOINTS,RACEHORSES,PREVALENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--6},
  title        = {Dorsoproximal proximal phalanx osteochondral fragmentation in 117 Warmblood horses},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-08-02-0016},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Declercq, Jeroen, Ann Martens, Dominiek Maes, B Boussauw, Ramses Forsyth, and KJ Boening. 2009. “Dorsoproximal Proximal Phalanx Osteochondral Fragmentation in 117 Warmblood Horses.” Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology 22 (1): 1–6.
APA
Declercq, Jeroen, Martens, A., Maes, D., Boussauw, B., Forsyth, R., & Boening, K. (2009). Dorsoproximal proximal phalanx osteochondral fragmentation in 117 Warmblood horses. VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY, 22(1), 1–6.
Vancouver
1.
Declercq J, Martens A, Maes D, Boussauw B, Forsyth R, Boening K. Dorsoproximal proximal phalanx osteochondral fragmentation in 117 Warmblood horses. VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY. 2009;22(1):1–6.
MLA
Declercq, Jeroen, Ann Martens, Dominiek Maes, et al. “Dorsoproximal Proximal Phalanx Osteochondral Fragmentation in 117 Warmblood Horses.” VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY 22.1 (2009): 1–6. Print.