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The design of active labour market policies: building in effective incentives

Bart Cockx (UGent)
(2000) INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW. 139(4). p.457-480
Author
Organization
Abstract
A first objective of this paper is to emphasise the role of a correct diagnosis of unemployment persistence for the design of effective active labour market policies. A second is to stress the importance of adequate incentives to programme administrators of active labour market policies, and that this may well be more important than providing adequate incentives to the unemployed. To illustrate this, we summarise two case studies evaluating active labour market policies in Belgium. The first one evaluates a work experience programme for welfare recipients. The second one analyses the short-term effect of vocational training programmes for unemployed workers on the probability of leaving unemployment. Finally, we invite economists to think harder about well designed performance-standards systems. We provide some guidelines for this research programme.
Keywords
Active labour market policies, policy design, unemployment

Citation

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Chicago
Cockx, Bart. 2000. “The Design of Active Labour Market Policies: Building in Effective Incentives.” International Labour Review 139 (4): 457–480.
APA
Cockx, B. (2000). The design of active labour market policies: building in effective incentives. INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW, 139(4), 457–480. Presented at the International Conference on Institutional and Financial Incentives for Social Insurance.
Vancouver
1.
Cockx B. The design of active labour market policies: building in effective incentives. INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW. 2000;139(4):457–80.
MLA
Cockx, Bart. “The Design of Active Labour Market Policies: Building in Effective Incentives.” INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW 139.4 (2000): 457–480. Print.
@article{670767,
  abstract     = {A first objective of this paper is to emphasise the role of a correct diagnosis of unemployment persistence for the design of effective active labour market policies. A second is to stress the importance of adequate incentives to programme administrators of active labour market policies, and that this may well be more important than providing adequate incentives to the unemployed. To illustrate this, we summarise two case studies evaluating active labour market policies in Belgium. The first one evaluates a work experience programme for welfare recipients. The second one analyses the short-term effect of vocational training programmes for unemployed workers on the probability of leaving unemployment. Finally, we invite economists to think harder about well designed performance-standards systems. We provide some guidelines for this research programme.},
  author       = {Cockx, Bart},
  issn         = {0020-7780},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {457--480},
  title        = {The design of active labour market policies: building in effective incentives},
  volume       = {139},
  year         = {2000},
}

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