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Vocational training of unemployed workers in Belgium

Bart Cockx (UGent)
(2003) APPLIED ECONOMICS QUARTERLY. 49(1). p.23-47
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Abstract
In this paper we estimate, for the 1989-93 period in Belgium, the effect of vocational classroom training on the rate of transition from unemployment. We propose a “control function” estimator accounting for variable treatment effects. In the absence of interaction effects between explanatory variables this estimator identifies treatment effects free from selection bias. A natural experiment induces exogenous sub-regional variation in the training supply. This provides over-identifying restrictions that cannot be rejected. During participation, the transition rate decreases by 23% to 30%. Afterwards it increases by 47% to 73%. Making training available for a broader population would, however, reduce the effectiveness of the programme.
Keywords
transition models, evaluation, job-search, Vocational training

Citation

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Chicago
Cockx, Bart. 2003. “Vocational Training of Unemployed Workers in Belgium.” Applied Economics Quarterly 49 (1): 23–47.
APA
Cockx, B. (2003). Vocational training of unemployed workers in Belgium. APPLIED ECONOMICS QUARTERLY, 49(1), 23–47.
Vancouver
1.
Cockx B. Vocational training of unemployed workers in Belgium. APPLIED ECONOMICS QUARTERLY. 2003;49(1):23–47.
MLA
Cockx, Bart. “Vocational Training of Unemployed Workers in Belgium.” APPLIED ECONOMICS QUARTERLY 49.1 (2003): 23–47. Print.
@article{670723,
  abstract     = {In this paper we estimate, for the 1989-93 period in Belgium, the effect of vocational classroom training on the rate of transition from unemployment. We propose a {\textquotedblleft}control function{\textquotedblright} estimator accounting for variable treatment effects. In the absence of interaction effects between explanatory variables this estimator identifies treatment effects free from selection bias. A natural experiment induces exogenous sub-regional variation in the training supply. This provides over-identifying restrictions that cannot be rejected. During participation, the transition rate decreases by 23\% to 30\%. Afterwards it increases by 47\% to 73\%. Making training available for a broader population would, however, reduce the effectiveness of the programme.},
  author       = {Cockx, Bart},
  issn         = {1611-6607},
  journal      = {APPLIED ECONOMICS QUARTERLY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {23--47},
  title        = {Vocational training of unemployed workers in Belgium},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2003},
}