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World War One aerial photography: an archaeological perspective

Birger Stichelbaut UGent (2009)
abstract
During World War One, for the first time, aerial photography rapidly developed as an intelligence tool that saw large scale application by all fighting nations. Huge numbers of these photographs have survived in archives all over Europe, the United States and even Australia. These are a remarkable primary record of the progress of World War One, but are also a unique record of the landscape at the beginning of the 20th century and a valuable source of data for archaeologists, landscape historians or cultural resource managers. This research describes the results of a large-scale archival research project that has created a GIS-based index to the geographic coverage of this imagery, supported by a quantification and characterisation of these collections. Beyond the overview of the archives, a methodology is developed how to process the photographs from a contact print in the archive to an analysis of a front sector. The aerial photographs and the developed methodology are tested in a large case study that illustrates the potential applications of this material for both traditional and conflict archaeology of World War One.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
promoter
UGent
organization
year
type
dissertation (monograph)
subject
pages
416 pages
place of publication
Ghent
ISBN
N/A
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
D1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
669602
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-669602
date created
2009-05-27 17:00:59
date last changed
2009-09-04 13:42:43
@phdthesis{669602,
  abstract     = {During World War One, for the first time, aerial photography rapidly developed as an intelligence tool that saw large scale application by all fighting nations. Huge numbers of these photographs have survived in archives all over Europe, the United States and even Australia. These are a remarkable primary record of the progress of World War One, but are also a unique record of the landscape at the beginning of the 20th century and a valuable source of data for archaeologists, landscape historians or cultural resource managers. This research describes the results of a large-scale archival research project that has created a GIS-based index to the geographic coverage of this imagery, supported by a quantification and characterisation of these collections. Beyond the overview of the archives, a methodology is developed how to process the photographs from a contact print in the archive to an analysis of a front sector. The aerial photographs and the developed methodology are tested in a large case study that illustrates the potential applications of this material for both traditional and conflict archaeology of World War One.},
  author       = {Stichelbaut, Birger},
  isbn         = {N/A},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {416},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {World War One aerial photography: an archaeological perspective},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Stichelbaut, Birger. 2009. “World War One Aerial Photography: An Archaeological Perspective”. Ghent.
APA
Stichelbaut, B. (2009). World War One aerial photography: an archaeological perspective. Ghent.
Vancouver
1.
Stichelbaut B. World War One aerial photography: an archaeological perspective. [Ghent]; 2009.
MLA
Stichelbaut, Birger. “World War One Aerial Photography: An Archaeological Perspective.” 2009 : n. pag. Print.